Archives for June, 2011

NPR’s Melissa Block traveled to Mozambique, where poverty and a shortage of both healthcare providers and facilities contribute to a high maternal mortality rate, for the first segment of the “Beginnings” series that will air throughout the summer on All Things Considered. She starts off with some grim statistics:

Hui Min Neo reports for AFP that 10 million people in the Horn of Africa are affected by the region’s worst drought in 60 years. Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda are suffering severe food shortages, and malnutrition rates are rising.

Did CDC ban those airline blankets?

Within 15 minutes of my 6:00 am flight from Austin to Baltimore, I knew it was going to be a long, COLD, 3-hour trip. I’d already turned off the overhhad vents to stop the frigid air from blowing on me, and contorted myself into a ball on my seat trying to stay warm. As I…

by Dick Clapp, DSc, MPH The documentary “Semper Fi: Always Faithful” was screened at the Congressional Auditorium in the Capitol Visitors Center on a hot, humid evening in Washington, DC on June 23. Congressman Brad Miller (D-NC) welcomed the audience of Congressional staff, North Carolina Senator Richard Burr (R-NC), and approximately 150 audience members and…

Occupational Health News Roundup

Deborah Sontag’s New York Times story about the murder of 25-year-old mental health worker Stephanie Moulton, allegedly at the hands of schizophrenic patient DeShawn Chappell, is a moving exploration of two grieving families and the many challenges facing the mental health care system. Deborah Sontag’s New York Times story about the murder of 25-year-old mental…

Speaking sensibly (and not) about public health regulations

Rhetoric has been flying this year, especially in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, about the “burdens” of federal regulations. Many of these members seem to despise EPA rules, CSPS rules, healthcare rules, and OSHA rules. Many of their talking points come from groups like the Heritage Foundation with their reports “Red Tape Rising: Obama’s Torrent…

by Elizabeth Grossman On June 10th the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Toxicology Program released the department’s 12th Report on Carcinogens, adding eight new substances to the overall list that now includes 240 compounds (or classes of compounds) known or reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens. Two of these…

My prediction on the next worker safety regulatory agenda was way off

In a post on May 5, I predicted that Labor Secretary Hilda Solis would be publishing within a few days her semi-annual regulatory plan for new worker health and safety rules. I made that projection based on requirements in the Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866, which suggest these plans be published every April…

A few of the recent pieces I’ve liked: Julie Appleby and Jordan Rau at Kaiser Health News: ‘Double’ Chest Scans Increase Costs and Exposure to Radiation Evan Bush in iWatch News: Obama administration signals higher gas royalties on public lands — and anticipated industry resistance Alix Spiegel for NPR: Why Seeing (The Unexpected) Is Often…

Still no day in court for worker safety violations at Crandall Canyon coal mine

NPR’s Howard Berkes reported this week on the disposition of criminal and civil charges stemming from the disaster nearly four years ago at the Crandal Canyon mine in Utah. The makings of the catastrophe began months earlier, (previous posts here, here, here) but came to a deadly denouement in the early morning hours of August…