This week (May 13-19, 2012) is National Police Week, which honors law enforcement officers who have been killed in the line of duty. According to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, “On average, one law enforcement officer is killed in the line of duty somewhere in the United States every 53 hours.” Events are taking place all week in DC; a schedule is here.

The National Police Week website has the preliminary 2011 “Roll Call of Heroes: Line of Duty Deaths” online. In addition to officers from city, county, and tribal police and sheriffs’ departments, it includes officials from the US Park Police; FBI; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; Customs and Border Protection; Federal Bureau of Prisons; Marshals Service; Secret Service; and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. It’s worth scrolling through as a reminder of just how much we owe to law enforcement officials who put their lives on the line every day to protect us.

In other news:

Reuters: Following injury complaints filed by union-represented workers at Hyatt Hotels, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration wrote a letter to the hotel chain flagging hazards that could result in ergonomic injuries to housekeeping staff.

Associated Press: A fire in a clothing factory in the Butuan, Philippines killed 17 women who worked there.

Washington Post/Center for Public Integrity: An internal Pentagon reports finds that the Department of Defense has not provided adequate protection to whistleblowers who face reprisals for reporting fraud, abuse, and the waste of taxpayer dollars.

Slate’s XX Factor Blog: Vogue magazine has adopted a new policy against printing photos of models who are younger than 16 or who “appear to have an eating disorder.” Designers will be asked to stop sending “unrealistically small sample sizes of their clothing” for photo shoots.

World Health Organization: The WHO is developing guidelines for protecting workers from potential risks of manufactured nanomaterials.

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