Archives for August, 2013

For older workers, the most dangerous occupational move may be getting behind the wheel.

In Los Angeles in 1924, after a series of mysterious deaths, Yersinia pestis, or bubonic plague, was swiftly identified as the culprit. Immediate quarantine of exposed people in selected areas helped to make the outbreak less than a devastating epidemic. But some public officials and newspaper reporters, in a desperate attempt to explain the origins…

Testing new regulatory czar’s commitment to transparency with OSHA’s silica proposed rule

OSHA’s recently released proposed rule on silica gives us a good opportunity to see if President Obama’s new regulatory czar will keep his promise for transparency in the rulemaking process.

On July 5, James Baldasarre, a 45-year old a Medford, Massachusetts US Postal Service employee who had worked for USPS for 24 years, died from excessive heat. According to news reports, shortly before collapsing in the 95-degree heat, Baldasarre texted his wife to say, “I’m going to die out here today. It’s so hot.”  On…

Helping others isn’t only the right thing to do, it’s the healthy thing to do.

At long last, OSHA publishes proposal to protect silica-exposed workers

A long-awaited proposal to protect 2 million workers from occupational silica exposure was announced today by OSHA.

Cones in roadway work zones not enough to protect workers

Highway work zones can be deadly for road construction and maintenance workers. Safety and road construction experts made a series of recommendations in 2001 to agencies on ways to make these projects safer for workers. Have they help to prevent fatalities?

Artisanal brick kilns in developing countries burn a lot of fuel and create a lot pollution. Organizations are promoting and arranging financing for alternatives.

Children breathe more air, drink more water and eat more food per unit of body weight than adults. Therefore, if a child’s air, water or food is contaminated with chemicals, children receive a larger dose per unit of body weight than would an adult in the same situation. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) has been unable to regulate chemicals effectively, and new chemical legislation must consider these key physiological differences.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Wage theft at is in the news; funding’s getting cut off for a program that can help first responders know what chemicals they might be exposed to while responding to industrial fires; and California’s Occupational Health Branch warns outdoor workers about the risk of Valley Fever.