Archives for February, 2015

Humanely treated: I care about chickens, but more about people

I’ve got to believe that someone who wants to know that the chicken they’re about to eat was humanely treated would want to know the same thing about the workers who slaughtered and packaged that poultry.

When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first vaccine to protect against cancers caused by certain strains of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, public health advocates cheered its life-saving potential. Unfortunately, the new vaccine quickly became embroiled in a debate over whether immunizing young girls against HPV, a sexually transmitted disease, would lead to risky sexual behavior.

March 1979 Washington Post: “Some Hair Dryers Give Off Asbestos”

Learning about a hairdresser with asbestos-related cancer made me curious about my circa 1980 hair dryer.

After the Colorado Family Planning Initiative (CFPI) started providing free IUDs and implants to low-income women at family planning clinics, the teen birth rate and abortion rate dropped sharply.

Occupational Health News Roundup

NPR investigates the high rates of work-related injuries among nurses; Illinois governor signs order targeting collective bargaining; OSHA cites one of the world’s largest furniture manufacturers; and thousands of oil refinery workers go on strike.

Not an “accident”: Marvis L. Myers, 31 suffers fatal work-related injury in Columbia, SC

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the U.S. This one occurred on February 6, 2015 in Columbia, SC.

It’s a persistent conundrum in the field of public health — how can we open people’s minds to positively receiving and acting on health information? Previous research has found that combining health tips with messages of self-affirmation may be a particularly effective strategy, but researchers weren’t entirely sure how self-affirmation worked at the neurological level. Now, a new study has found that self-affirmation’s effects on a particular region of the brain may be a major key to behavior change.

Businessman’s problem: Workers can’t keep up with the machines

The story was about US immigration policy, but my-oh-my what it said about working conditions in poultry processing plants.

Injuries and deaths on minds of striking Steelworkers

Delayed maintenance, production pressure and fatigue from too much overtime are factors that compromise workplace safety. These are some of the issues Steelworkers have on the bargaining table during the union’s biggest strike in 35 years.

Recent pieces address the toll of measles; evidence vs. hype in treating heroin addiction; why foodborne-illness outbreaks linked to poultry keep happening; and more.