Archives for September, 2015

“Tired of getting knocked on the head”

A worker’s ingenuity helps to prevent a dumpster-related injury.

Not an “accident”: Terry Lakey, 51, suffers fatal work-related injury in Waco, TX

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Wednesday, September 16 in Waco, Texas.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Former employees at the Blue Bell ice cream plant in Texas report dangerous work conditions; federal health researchers announce new study of oil field workers; Democrats propose new labor rights legislation; and North Dakota legislators announce efforts to hold big oil companies responsible for worker deaths.

As most people in any empirical or scientific field know, the gold standard for experimenting and establishing causality is the randomized controlled trial (RCT). In an RCT, subjects are randomly assigned to one of two conditions: an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group receives the intervention or drug and the control group…

“Sharing happiness” is company motto, workers treated with “distrust rather than respect”

Poultry processing firm Allen Harim Foods’ slogan is “Improving the Quality of Life and Sharing Happiness.” It’s difficult for me to see how either is achieved with its mismanagement of work-related injuries and the hazards that cause them.

Recent pieces address the idea of shifting funds from Planned Parenthood to community health centers; the effectiveness of Washington, DC’s needle exchange; the spread of tickborne diseases; and pieces by and about neurologist and author Oliver Sacks.

Yearbook on OHS profiles exceptional reporting by investigative journalists

The most memorable event in the last 12 months on workers’ health and safety topics was the exceptional reporting by journalists. One section of The Year in US Occupational Health and Safety is devoted to reporters’ contributions.

When it comes to protecting workers, advocates often turn to science. Whether it’s research on the effectiveness of an intervention, new injury surveillance data or novel methods for pinpointing particularly vulnerable workers, science is key to advancing workplace safety. In our fourth edition of “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety,” we highlight some of the most interesting and noteworthy research of the past year.

Paid sick leave, new rights for temp workers, and extending OSHA protections to public sector employees were among the many victories that unfolded at the state and local levels in the last 12 months and that we highlight in this year’s edition of “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety.”

Worker safety and health yearbook recaps key events at federal agencies

“The Year in US Occupational Health & Safety” recaps some of the most notable activities at the federal level to address workplace hazards.