Archives for January, 2016

Tale of two cities: public transit drivers and bathroom breaks

The transit authorities in Washington DC and Houston TX have different attitudes and approaches to address bus drivers’ needs to use access toilets during their workshifts. If I was a bus driver, I’d want a program like Houston’s.

Not an “accident”: Justin ‘J.D.’ Jorgensen, 30, suffers fatal work-related injury in Altoona, Iowa

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Wednesday, January 6 in Altoona, IA.

Scientists are finding that night shift work comes with a range of particular health risks, from heart disease to diabetes to breast cancer. This month, another study joined the pack — this one on the risk of traffic crashes among those who head home from work at sunrise.

The omnibus spending bill includes a measure that allows the use of federal funds for state and local needle-exchange program — and it was championed by Kentucky Republicans.

These days, there’s a lot of attention on finding new and creative ways to turn around the nation’s opioid abuse and overdose problem. And it’s attention that’s very much needed because the problem is only getting worse.

Who’s paying the cost of lung transplants for work-related lung diseases?

Some disabled coal miners have received lung transplants as a treatment for black lung disease. It’s clearly a work-related illness, but workers’ compensation insurance doesn’t seem to be paying the bill for the $1 million procedure.

To address health inequities more effectively, public health practitioners must not only address the determinants of health, but also the causes of inequities in the determinants including multiple forms of racism and the distribution of power.

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Gerald Lyle Thompson could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Occupational Health News Roundup

ProPublica offers a disturbing look inside the extravagant workers’ comp industry; workers speak up about conditions inside hospital hotels; New York’s governor announces plan to raise minimum wages for state university workers; and a worker is killed at a Ford Motor Company plant in Chicago.

As 2015 drew to a close, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality announced some good news: Fewer US patients are dying from hospital-acquired conditions like pressure ulcers and catheter-associated infections.