Liz Borkowski

Recent pieces address the American Chemistry Council and flame retardants; the avian flu that’s hitting Midwestern poultry farms; what the next labor fight will tackle; and more.

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research has released a new Status of Women in the States report that show how women’s health has improved, or not, on a variety of different measures. It’s no surprise that they found disparities both between states and between racial and ethnic groups.

Last week Tyson Foods, the largest US poultry producer, announced that it was working to eliminate the use of human antibiotics in its US broiler chicken flock by September 2017.

The 2015 Pulitzer Prize winner for Public Service went to South Carolina’s Post and Courier for the chillingly effective series “Till Death Do Us Part,” about the state’s inadequate response to domestic violence.

Last week, President Obama signed long-awaited legislation that will put an end to periodic panic at the prospect of massive, sudden cuts to Medicare physician payments.

Recent pieces address condom innovation and approval, government handouts to the rich, online violence against women and girls, and more.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Young v. UPS leaves it up to lower courts to decide whether UPS discriminated against Peggy Young by not giving her light duty while she was pregnant. In the meantime, new guidance from researchers can help physicians advise pregnant patients whose jobs involve lifting.

A study published in a new supplement to the American Journal of Public Health investigates the extent to which public health activities in metropolitan areas suffered during the recent recession.

Researchers analyze crash data following London’s 2003 implementation of a congestion-charge zone, while Seattle reduces transit fares for low-income riders.

Recent pieces address the 50-year-old Older Americans Act, Ebola’s lasting impact on maternal health, day laborers’ fights for fair treatment, and more.