Liz Borkowski

US children have three main routes to health-insurance coverage, but the “family glitch” leaves some families without an affordable insurance option.

Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration published a final rule that updates requirements for what prescription-drug information must disclose about potential effects for pregnant and breastfeeding women and their babies. And last month, the agency released Drug Trials Snapshots, which is part of a pilot project to help consumers learn more about the clinical trials upon which new drugs’ approvals are based.

Recent pieces address President Obama’s remarks on events in Ferguson, an Obamacare program that works but is shutting down, retail workers’ pay, and more.

As Healthcare.gov welcomes enrollees for 2015 health-insurance plans, we’re seeing far fewer technical problems, modest premium increases overall (but not everywhere), and a continued lack of affordable options for those in the “coverage gap.”

Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014 features two pieces that remind us how public-health interventions can become less effective if we as a society don’t use them effectively

A new Data Note on results from the Kaiser Family Foundation’s recent survey highlights how this country’s lack of nationwide paid sick leave places a disproportionate burden on women – and is particularly hard on low-income mothers.

Recent pieces address healthcare workers’ safety and the research behind controlling Ebola’s spread; end-of-life planning; contraception; and more.

The American Academy of Pediatrics published a “Contraceptives for Adolescents” policy statement that advises pediatricians to consider long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods as first-line contraceptive choices for adolescents. Recent research shows that women, including teens, will choose LARCs when cost is not a barrier and when healthcare providers can help patients choose and access the contraceptives that best meet their needs.

Momentum is building for policies that allow workers to care for their own health and that of their family members without risking financial ruin.

Talking about the end of life

Ezekiel Emanuel hopes to die at age 75, and is willing to forego certain medical care in order to do so. The Institute of Medicine recommends that we do more to ensure that our healthcare system honors such individual preferences about end-of-life healthcare.