Chemical facility safety

Category archives for Chemical facility safety

Occupational Health News Roundup

Advocates work to expand consumer concern from humanely treated food to humanely treated workers; workers with children face struggles in Silicon Valley; Texas lawmakers introduce bill aimed at fertilizer plants; Microsoft to require paid leave policies at its suppliers; and the McDonald’s wage hike is too small for too few.

Oil company uncomfortable with reminder of 35 deaths at Galveston refinery

Marathon Petroleum Company’s philosophy of corporate citizenship says one thing about safety and differing viewpoints, but it behaves differently when those topics are presented bearing the names of workplace fatality victims.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Reporters investigate the state of safety at oil refineries following the 2005 Texas City explosion; fast food workers file OSHA complaints; farm workers go on strike in Baja California; and San Francisco officials vote in support of fair working conditions for shuttle bus workers.

Glimmer of hope for beleaguered Chemical Safety Board

After four hours of testimony on retaliation against employees, abuse of power and more, there was a glimmer of hope from new leadership at the Chemical Safety Board.

History, art and prevention: European workplace safety posters

An historical collection of workplace safety posters from European agencies and advocates cover themes that are still relevant today.

Injuries and deaths on minds of striking Steelworkers

Delayed maintenance, production pressure and fatigue from too much overtime are factors that compromise workplace safety. These are some of the issues Steelworkers have on the bargaining table during the union’s biggest strike in 35 years.

“In the 602 days since the West, Texas tragedy there have been 355 chemical accidents resulting in 79 deaths and 1500 hospitalizations,” said Committee Chair Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) opening the hearing. “Essentially,” said Boxer, since the West, Texas accident, there’s been a U.S. incident involving hazardous chemicals every other day. “This,” she said, “is absolutely outrageous.”

Occupational Health News Roundup

Petrochemical companies spend millions to undermine the science on benzene; in-depth series sheds light on the horrific working conditions in Mexico’s agricultural sector; National Labor Relations Board rules in favor of worker organizing; and federal officials grilled on response to West fertilizer explosion.

DuPont is a “stickler” for safety, but what does that really mean?

Four workers from DuPont’s La Porte, TX facility are dead. Their employer makes hundreds of millions on its behavior-based, blame the worker safety program. Federal investigators will find that the catastrophe occurred because of decisions made far up the chain of command, not unsafe behaviors by the victims.

Following the deadly April 17, 2013 explosion at the West, Texas fertilizer plant – and a series of other catastrophic incidents involving hazardous materials – President Obama directed federal agencies to improve chemical facility security and safety. Their report makes recommendations but does not mandate any immediate action. Meanwhile, dangerous chemical releases occur at workplaces around the US almost daily.