Chemicals Policy

Category archives for Chemicals Policy

US Chemical Safety Board to hit hard on OSHA’s inaction on chemical hazards

The US Chemical Safety Board has been criticized for not doing more to press recipients of its recommendations to implement them. At a public meeting later this month, the Board will consider classifying OSHA’s response to several recommendations as “Open-Unacceptable.”

Following passage of a Massachusetts law requiring companies to report on their use of toxic chemicals, environmental releases of potentially carcinogenic chemicals declined 93% between 1991 and 2010 while reported use declined 32% between 1990 and 2010.

When Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) passed away Monday at the age of 89, the Senate lost one of its longest-serving members and the US lost a public-health champion.

Colorado community demanded health impact review of 200 proposed natural gas wells

The residents of Battlement Mesa didn’t want their “Colorado Dream” to turn into a nightmare because of a proposed hydrofracking project. They turned to a Health Impact Assessment for help.

Death on the Job report: US workers deserve better protections

The AFL-CIO’s “Death on the Job” report shows why U.S. workers deserve much better protections than they are getting.

“It was up to the locals,” insists State officials about explosion risk at West Fertilizer

The first public hearing to examine the circumstances that led to the catastrophic April 17 explosion at West Fertilizer was held. Texas State lawmakers heard testimony from eight State agencies.

Flavored java, coffee bean workers, and deadly lung disease

This week’s MMWR describes cases of bronchiolitis obliterans diagnosed in two individuals who worked— not at a microwave popcorn plant—-at a Texas coffee bean processing company.

Two new books illustrate how and why the US system for regulating chemicals often fails to adequately protect human health.

Detroit can’t recover economically with lead-poisoned children

The headlines in Detroit are focused on the city’s financial woes, but the city’s future is at additional risk because of lead poisoned children in the city’s public schools.

After nearly three decades as a USDA food safety inspector, Stan Painter tells me he now feels like “window dressing standing at the end of the line as product whizzes by.”