Category archives for Government

Occupational Health News Roundup

Manufacturing workers in the border city of Ciudad Juárez organize for better working conditions; a stretched OSHA struggles to ensure safe workplaces in Houston; Fight for $15 makes it to the U.S. Capitol; and OSHA investigates the death of a FedEx worker in Memphis.

OSHA’s beryllium rule: a victim of White House’s “regulatory reform” nonsense

A business consulting firm submitted comments to OSHA on the agency’s proposed beryllium rule. The firm calls out OSHA for offering way too many regulatory alternatives. It suggest OSHA return to its past practice of proposing a particular approach (or two) and justifying it.

Trial of Mining CEO Blankenship: Quotes from Week 7

The criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship went into its seventh week. The jurors heard from the prosecution’s 27th (and final witness) and heard the defense team rest its case without calling any witnesses.

It’s not surprising that food insecurity has a negative health and academic impact on young children — numerous studies have come to that conclusion. However, a new study has begun to dig a little deeper into the topic, zeroing in on the lingering aftermath of the Great Recession, when food insecurity and child poverty reached record levels, and examining the particular effects of transitioning from not worrying about having enough food to living in a household with limited or uncertain access to food.

In February 2015, a group of 7-Eleven night shift workers in Buffalo, New York, filed a complaint with OSHA. Sick of enduring regular bouts of verbal harassment, racial slurs and even death threats from customers — threats they often experienced while working alone with no security guard — they hoped OSHA could help bring about safer working conditions. Unfortunately, the agency decided not to investigate.

For the first time since 2006, cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis are on the rise, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency reports that while the sexually transmitted diseases continue to impact young people and women most severely, the recent increases were driven by rising disease rates among men.

Trial of Mining CEO Blankenship: Quotes from Week 6

The criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship went into its sixth week. Jurors heard from a financial expert and an FBI special agent.

According to a new, first-of-its-kind survey of the nation’s public health workforce, 38 percent of workers are planning to leave their current positions before the next decade. On its face, that’s a deeply worrisome number. But Brian Castrucci is an optimist — “where there is change, there is opportunity,” he says.

Fatal work injury that killed Davide Nascimento was preventable, OSHA cites A. Martins and Sons

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Davide Nascimento could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Occupational Health News Roundup

The Center for Public Integrity investigates occupational illness and the workers’ compensation system; federal officials accuse coal mining operator of worker retaliation; OSHA penalties finally rise to meet inflation; and low-wage workers go on strike across the nation for better wages.