Government

Category archives for Government

You know how opponents of paid sick leave and raising the minimum wage always cite resistance in the business community? Well, in turns out that such resistance might be closer to a marketing gimmick rather than a genuine reflection of employer sentiment.

In debates over air pollution control, it’s always a tug-of-war between the cost to business and the cost to public health. Late last month, a study emerged with new data for the public health column: the cost of the nation’s nearly 16,000 annual preterm births linked to air pollution is more than a whopping $5 billion.

Workplace fatalities due to reckless business decisions

It’s time to get passed thinking that workplace fatalities are “just accidents.” A new toolkit by the Center for Progressive Reform will help worker- and community-coalitions encourage prosecutors to review on-the-job fatalities for possible criminal charges.

Occupational Health News Roundup

A peek inside the life of Miami’s hotel housekeepers during spring break; a tie vote at the Supreme Court is a win for labor unions; California on track to adopt statewide minimum wage of $15; and Los Angeles nurses go on strike for safer working conditions.

Who’s saying what about OSHA’s new silica standard

Here are some of my favorite quotes in response to OSHA publishing a final rule on silica dust.

Here’s what states get when they expand Medicaid: more savings, more revenue, more jobs, more access to care for their communities.

A recent study finds vaccine refusals have, indeed, accelerated the resurgence of whooping cough and measles here in the U.S. The findings are making headlines around the country — and comment sections are filling up with vitriol from anti-vaxxers — but it would feel amiss not to highlight the study on a blog dedicated to public health. But first, let’s remind ourselves of the pain and suffering that preceded vaccines.

Yearning for the footnotes: OSHA report on amputations, severe injuries

A new OSHA report recaps the agency’s first year receiving reports of amputations and hospitalizations. OSHA shields the companies from scrutiny by not mentioning their names.

In another example of the value of investing in public health, a recent study finds that PulseNet, a national foodborne illness outbreak network, prevents about 276,000 illnesses every year, which translates into savings of $507 million in medical costs and lost productivity. That’s a pretty big return on investment for a system that costs just $7.3 million annually to operate.

Obama’s regulatory czar and (sort of) transparency

President Obama’s regulatory czar testified before Congress on Tuesday and proclaimed the transparency of his office’s operations. His claims about disclosures of private meetings don’t jive with my experience.