Healthcare

Category archives for Healthcare

In 2005, Florida legislators passed the nation’s first “Stand Your Ground” law, expanding legal immunity for residents to use lethal force when they believe they’re being threatened. A decade later, a new study finds that Florida has experienced a significant increase in homicides, while states without such laws have not.

More and more of America’s adolescents and young adults are struggling with depression, especially young women, according to a study released earlier this week.

Three days out from the election and many of us are still trying to adjust to this new reality. It’s been a very rough week.

Johns Hopkins faces class-action lawsuit for defrauding miners with black lung disease

The families of two coal miners are charging that Johns Hopkins University’s Black Lung Program with intent to defraud hundreds of workers from federally earned benefits for work-related disabling lung disease. Appropriate for today’s holiday, both men were U.S. veterans.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Hispanic hotel workers in Las Vegas are becoming a powerful political force; families of miners who died from black lung disease sue Johns Hopkins Hospital; Milwaukee officials approve a living wage ordinance for county workers; and women in France and Iceland walk off the job to protest the gender wage gap.

Highlights from final day at APHA’s Annual Meeting

The final day at the APHA annual meeting featured speakers addressing long-acting reversible contraceptives, examining news coverage of health, and connecting farmers’ markets to people receiving food assistance.

APHA adopts policies on minimum wage, fluorinated chemicals at annual meeting

The American Public Health Association adopted 11 new policy statements at its annual meeting which will guide the organization’s advocacy work in the coming years.

More news from APHA’s Annual Meeting and Expo in Denver

Public health approaches to gun violence, human trafficking, and hundreds of other topics were explored on Tuesday at the APHA Annual Meeting.

While health policy hasn’t been at the forefront of this year’s presidential election, the next person to sit in the White House could have a transformative effect on health care access, affordability and inequity. Of course, with so many variables in play, it’s hard to predict what either candidate could realistically accomplish on the health care front. However, a new report might provide some insightful clues.

In troubling public health news, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported just yesterday that combined cases of gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia in the U.S. have climbed to the highest number on record.