MSHA

Category archives for MSHA

The long-time residents of Iron County, Wisconsin who make up the Iron County Joint Impacts Mining Committee say the open-pit iron mine planned for the Penokee Hills of northern Wisconsin – a range that extends into Michigan where it’s known as the Gogebic Range – will bring much needed good jobs and economic development. Such…

Where is the Labor Dept’s proposal to protect mine workers from respirable silica?

The Labor Department took the first major step this month to protect the health of many U.S. workers who are exposed to respirable crystalline silica. Workers in the mining industry, however, are not addressed by the Department’s action.

Prison term for Massey official, criminal probe of 2010 coal mine disaster continues

A fourth official formerly associated with Massey Energy was sentenced to 3 ½ years in prison for conspiring to thwart federal mine safety laws. Massey Energy was the operator in 2010 of the site where the worst coal mine disaster in 40 years occurred.

Labor Day assessment of federal efforts to improve (or impede) worker safety protections

The second annual report on US worker health and safety offers a review of activities and new policies at the federal scene, and a recap on the best reporting about it by the nation’s journalists.

Safety equipment installed after the fact, too little, too late for Army veteran coal miner

Three months after a WV coal miner is killed on the job, the company decides to install safety equipment that could have saved his life.

Pushing back against anti-regulatory forces, safety and environmental protections long overdue

The newly created Senate Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on Oversight, Federal Rights and Agency Action held today its first hearing. Witnesses described the toll on public health and safety when the regulatory process is paralyzed by powerful interests and required analyses with no proven benefits.

Death on the Job report: US workers deserve better protections

The AFL-CIO’s “Death on the Job” report shows why U.S. workers deserve much better protections than they are getting.

$70 million owed by mine operators for unpaid safety penalties, time for “boot” device equivalent

In many cities, traffic control officers will “boot” are vehicle if it’s racked up too many unpaid parking tickets. It’s time for an equivalent sanction for employers who violate labor laws and refuse to pay the penalties.

It’s not rocket science to prevent coal miner’s deaths

Greg Byers, 43, worked underground at Arch Coal/ICG’s Pocahontas Coal Mine in Beckley, WV. He suffered a serious injury in July 2012 that led to his death. An investigation report explains how common sense–not rocket science–could have prevented his work-related death.

This takes the cake: Kentucky company sues coal miner who complained about safety problems

HuffPo’s Dave Jamieson writes this week about a Kentucky worker who raised concerns about safety problems at Armstrong Coal, was fired for doing so and complained about it to the Labor Department, and is now being sued by his former employer for making his claim.