Obesity

Category archives for Obesity

In a first-of-its-kind study, a researcher has estimated that the health-related economic savings of removing bisphenol A from our food supply is a whopping $1.74 billion annually. And that’s a conservative estimate.

On average, eating healthy costs about $1.50 more per day than the least healthy diets, according to a new study. The extra cost seems insignificant at first — a small cup of coffee often costs more — but it all adds up to be a considerable barrier for many low-income families.

After years of hearing about alarming increases in states’ obesity rates, it was nice to get some good news: CDC reports that the percentage of low-income preschool children classified as obese has declined in 19 states.

Teenagers’ calorie consumption at McDonalds versus Subway

Researchers compare the calories purchased by teenagers at McDonald’s versus Subway.

Going back for seconds at all-you-can-eat Chinese buffets

Researchers with Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab observe diners’ behavior to predict the number of trips they’ll make to the buffet at all-you-can-eat Chinese restaurants.

If you serve it, they will eat it. That’s one of the many lessons gleaned from a new report on the national Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program.

When it comes to good health, America is far from top dog. A new report finds that although the nation has experienced improvements in life expectancy and survival in the last century, we’re falling behind our counterparts in other high-income countries.

A new study finds that one-third of the subjects whose diabetes went into remission following gastric bypass surgery developed the disease again within five years.

Exploring links between working conditions and obesity in low-wage workers

Most current strategies to address the obesity problem in Americans focus on individuals changing their behavior. A new report illuminates why those strategies alone ignore the work environment as a contributor to obesity risk.

Behaviors are major contributors to our health status, but a tiny fraction of US health spending goes to encouraging healthy behaviors like physical activity. The Bipartisan Policy Center has some recommendations for increasing physical activity, including policy changes that make it easier for people to play and get around actively.