occupational fatalities

Category archives for occupational fatalities

Not an “accident”: Emilio Dodd, 55, suffers fatal work-related injury in Lewisville, TX

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, September 6, in Lewisville, TX

Fatal work injury that killed Harold Felton, 36, was preventable, Washington-OSHA cites Alki Construction

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Harold Felton, 36, could have been prevented had Alki Construction followed worker safety regulations.

From the weakening of workers’ compensation to the lives of America’s nuclear plant workers, it was another year of stellar news reporting on worker health and safety.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Restaurant workers in California experience severe injuries and disability; OSHA pushes back against a judge’s ruling in poultry plant inspection case; Gov. Chris Christie vetoes a $15 minimum wage bill; and the women making Nike products in Vietnam often earn poverty wages and face grueling production expectations.

Not an “accident”: Rick Simer, 64, suffers fatal work-related injury in Denver, CO

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, August 9, in Denver, CO

Death on water slide at Schlitterbahn follows worker death

When I heard the news about the 10 year old who died at the Schlitterbahn water park in Kansas City, I couldn’t help but remember Nico Benavides. Benavides was fatally injured while working at Schlitterbahn’s park on San Padre Island, TX.

Fatal work injury that killed Kevin Purpura, 39, was preventable, OSHA cites Woda Construction and Sandow Development

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Kevin Purpura, 39, could have been prevented had Woda Construction Inc. and Sandow Development followed worker safety regulations.

Not an “accident”: Timothy Dubberly, 58, suffers fatal work-related injury in Fernandina Beach, FL

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, July 16, in Fernandina Beach, FL.

Convenience store operators snub crime-prevention ordinances

Dallas and Houston have city ordinances in place to reduce the risk of violence perpetrated against convenience store clerks. NIOSH researchers found that few establishments comply with the law.

Mining is one of the most dangerous jobs in America, with more than 600 workers dying in fatal workplace incidents between 2004 and the beginning of July. And many more miners die long after they’ve left the mines from occupational illnesses such as black lung disease, while others live with the debilitating aftermath of workplace injuries. Today, researchers know a great deal about the health risks miners face on the job, but some pretty big gaps remain.