occupational fatalities

Category archives for occupational fatalities

Dozens of safety inspector positions in California are vacant while workplace fatalities and injuries in the state are on the rise. Cal/OSHA has had an average of 34 vacant field enforcement positions a month since July 2015, which means that more than $10 million in state-authorized funding was left unused.

OSHA throws book at contractor for trenching death. I hear lame excuses for ignoring risk

DJ Meyer died when the trench he was working in collapsed around him. OSHA has proposed a $712,000 penalty against the company. When these incidents occur, what excuses does OSHA hear from the employers?

Nation’s largest wireless infrastructure provider linked to two worker deaths in eight days

In an eight-day period, two workers lost their lives at communication towers. Their deaths reminded me of the grave hazards in the industry and the subcontracting model that can shield firms from responsibility for the hazards they create.

Worst of the worst for worker rights and safety: “Dirty Dozen” profiled in new report

National COSH’s “Dirty Dozen” report profiles 12 employers with horrific safety and labor practices. Of all the fine content in the report two short lines will be sticking with me this Worker Memorial Day.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Immigrant workers who get injured at work now fearful about accessing workers’ comp; women ironworkers win six months of paid maternity leave; many home health workers still going without health insurance coverage; and a health care union declares itself a sanctuary for immigrants.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Federal contractors receive billions in public funds despite wage violations; Alabama’s auto industry putting workers’ lives in danger; OSHA delays life-saving silica standard; and Maryland and Nevada legislators approve paid sick leave measures.

Prevention message opportunities in media coverage of worker fatalities?

Instead of calling worker fatalities “accidents,” could the press communicate how such incidents could be averted? A new paper published in the Journal of Agromedicine got me thinking about the topic.

Exaggerating the cost of workplace safety penalties, instead of limbs, lungs, lives saved

It bothers me when politicians try to rile up employers by exaggerating the cost of OSHA penalties.

Fatal work injury that killed Rick Simer, 64, was preventable, OSHA cites K.B.P. Coil Coaters

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Simer, 64, could have been prevented had K.B.P. Coil Coaters, Inc. followed worker safety regulations.

Worker’s death at demolition site a “freak accident”?

Cirilo Banuelos Reyes, 50, fell four stories to his death at a demolition site. His boss called it a “freak accident.” OSHA will likely find it could have been prevented.