occupational fatalities

Category archives for occupational fatalities

Not an “accident”: Chandler Warren suffers fatal work-related injury at FedEx Hub, Memphis, TN 

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on July 2 at FedEx’s flagship sorting facility in Memphis, Tennessee.

States and localities are where it’s at, opportunities to win safer workplaces

Advocates for safer workplaces are looking to advance reforms at the state and local level. A new manual “Winning Safer Workplaces” is designed to enhance the conversation.

Not an “accident”: Jason Nolte, 31, suffers fatal work-related injury at Aurora, Colorado company

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on June 21 at a window manufacturer in Aurora, Colorado.

Assistant fatally burned in UCLA professor’s lab, not an obstacle in receiving NIH grants

A UCLA chemistry professor’s website announces his lab’s award of an NIH grant. I wonder if we’ll also see an announcement explaining the settlement of the criminal charges against him for the work-related death of Sheri Sangji?

“He gave us the truth of what happened to our loved ones”

Investigator Jim Beck got to the bottom of what happened at the Upper Big Branch coal mine disaster. He died last week from cancer.

Not an “accident”: Chris Williamson suffers fatal work-related injury in Florence, Alabama

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on June 4 on an electrical pole in Florence, Alabama.

The Huffington Post investigates how the mining industry cheats worker safety; Seattle set to raise minimum wage to $15; and the death of a hummus plant worker could have been prevented with better safety practices.

Not an “accident”: Juan Carlos Reyes suffers fatal work-related injury in Harlingen, Texas

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on May 24 at a hotel construction site in Texas.

A investigative Houston Chronicle piece exposes the dangers of the tank cleaning industry; North Carolina lawmakers back fracking secrecy with jail time; and Wal-Mart contractor settles in wage theft case.

California’s workforce has grown by about 22 percent in the last 20 years but the number of safety inspectors for the 17 million people employed in the state’s 1.34 million workplaces has decreased by about 11 percent. This leaves California’s workforce – the largest of any US state – with the lowest number of inspectors per workers of any state with its own occupational safety and health plan for private-sector workers. California has so few workplace safety inspectors that it would take 173 years to inspect each workplace in the state just once.