Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

I’m shocked, shocked: Part 2 on U.S. coal miners and black lung disease

I explain five reasons why I’m not shocked by the epidemic of black lung cases among U.S. miners.

OSHA throws book at contractor for trenching death. I hear lame excuses for ignoring risk

DJ Meyer died when the trench he was working in collapsed around him. OSHA has proposed a $712,000 penalty against the company. When these incidents occur, what excuses does OSHA hear from the employers?

Grim trend in fatal injuries to U.S. coal miners

The first six months of the Trump administration nine coal miners have been fatally injured on the job. That’s one more than all of 2016.

Elon Musk questioned by Tesla stockholders about worker safety

Tesla’s investment in solar, auto, and battery technology is helping in the transition from fossil fuels to sustainable energy sources. The question is whether the firm will accomplish it on the high road of labor rights and worker safety.

Georgia congressman resurrects bad idea, poultry workers threatened with faster line speeds

A Georgia congressman thinks poultry plants should be able to increase line speeds to 175 birds per minute. That was a bad idea from Obama’s USDA. It was nixed, but now it’s resurrected.

A historical look at the ‘radium girls’ and their legacy of worker justice; OSHA’s website for receiving injury and illness logs not accepting submissions; California farmworkers sickened by pesticide after Trump’s EPA reverses course on a probable ban; and former Walmart employees file class-action lawsuit for pregnancy discrimination.

Criticism of Arizona’s arbitrary reduction in workplace safety penalties

A complaint from National COSH and an investigation by the Arizona Daily Star led federal OSHA to examine the Industrial Commission of Arizona’s discounting of safety inspectors’ findings.

Accounting professors have confirmed what we always suspected: companies which are scrambling to meet or just beat Wall Street analysts’ profit projections have worker injury rates that are 12% higher than other employers.  The recent research indicates that frantic efforts by “benchmark-beating” employers – increasing employees’ workloads or pressuring them to work faster, at the same time that these employers cut safety spending on activities like maintaining equipment or training employees, to meet the profit projections – are the likely source of increased injuries and illnesses.

High temps, no water, no breaks for workers in FL, GA, TX construction booms

Despite a post-recession construction boom in the southern U.S., a survey of 1,435 construction workers describe low wages, sparse benefits, and no potable water on sweltering summer days.

Worst of the worst for worker rights and safety: “Dirty Dozen” profiled in new report

National COSH’s “Dirty Dozen” report profiles 12 employers with horrific safety and labor practices. Of all the fine content in the report two short lines will be sticking with me this Worker Memorial Day.