Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

Following the deadly April 17, 2013 explosion at the West, Texas fertilizer plant – and a series of other catastrophic incidents involving hazardous materials – President Obama directed federal agencies to improve chemical facility security and safety. Their report makes recommendations but does not mandate any immediate action. Meanwhile, dangerous chemical releases occur at workplaces around the US almost daily.

Not an “accident”: Chris Williamson suffers fatal work-related injury in Florence, Alabama

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on June 4 on an electrical pole in Florence, Alabama.

The fiction of OSHA’s agenda for new worker safety rules

Milestones set, milestones missed. The fiction of OSHA’s regulatory agenda for new worker safety protections.

Where you live may be hazardous to your health. This is the conclusion of several new reports including one by the Environmental Justice and Health Alliance for Chemical Reform that shows who lives in US communities most vulnerable to hazardous chemical exposures and the CDC’s latest examination of health disparities.

Not an “accident”: Juan Carlos Reyes suffers fatal work-related injury in Harlingen, Texas

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on May 24 at a hotel construction site in Texas.

White House is the reason children are still working in US tobacco fields

A Human Rights Watch report on children working in US tobacco fields resurrects Obama Administration decisions to abandon a Labor Department regulation to protect youngsters working in agriculture.

California’s workforce has grown by about 22 percent in the last 20 years but the number of safety inspectors for the 17 million people employed in the state’s 1.34 million workplaces has decreased by about 11 percent. This leaves California’s workforce – the largest of any US state – with the lowest number of inspectors per workers of any state with its own occupational safety and health plan for private-sector workers. California has so few workplace safety inspectors that it would take 173 years to inspect each workplace in the state just once.

Not an “accident”: Ricardo Ramos suffers fatal work-related injury at Zeeland, Michigan plant

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on May 10 at a meat processing plant in Michigan.

Despite the brunches, flower sales, and media attention lavished on moms each Mother’s Day, US policy doesn’t express as much appreciation for mothers (or fathers) as it should.

In New York, construction is the deadliest industry, with immigrant workers experiencing half of all occupational-related fatalities. In Massachusetts in 2013, it’s estimated that upward of 500 workers died from occupational disease, at least 1,800 were diagnosed with cancers associated with workplace exposures and 50,000 workers experienced serious injury. In Wyoming, workplace deaths climbed to a five-year high in 2012.