Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

Higher OSHA penalties ahead, discounts on danger remain

Congress fixed a loophole and OSHA penalties will now be adjusted regularly to account for inflation. But if Labor Secretary Perez is serious about leveling the playing field for those who follow the law, he should consider what’s being called OSHA’s “discount on death.”

Detroit Free Press reporters investigate Michigan’s flawed worker safety oversight system; workers in China’s fireworks factories face life-threatening conditions; New Mexico farmworkers win major workers’ comp victory; and OSHA rules in worker’s favor in asbestos retaliation case.

Low wages certainly impact a person’s health, from where people live to what they eat to how often they can visit a doctor. And low and stagnant wages certainly contribute to poverty, which is a known risk factor for poor health and premature mortality. But should low wages be considered an occupational health hazard?

Fatal work injury that killed Eric McClellan was preventable, Virginia-OSHA cites Reynolds Metals

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Eric McClellan could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

A puzzling OSHA regulatory agenda for last 6 months of Obama term

OSHA added five new topics to its regulatory agenda despite being tardy completing its current rulemaking activities. Reading the agenda brings several questions to mind.

The road toward eliminating the threat of asbestos has been long, slow-moving, incredibly frustrating and littered with significant hurdles. Thankfully, advocates like Linda Reinstein, who lost her husband to asbestos-related disease in 2003, refuse to get discouraged.

Fatal work injury that killed Kenneth Schultz was preventable, Cal-OSHA cites Labor Ready

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Kenneth Schultz could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Coal miner, newly retired, but not as miners’ safety rep

Flip Wilson retired months ago after 40 years as a coal miner. Co-workers designated him as their safety representative. He drives 70 miles roundtrip to accompany mine inspectors and ensure the company is following the law.

Not an “accident”: Agrey Emile Coudakpo, 32, suffers fatal work-related injury in Jessup, MD

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, May 27, in Jessup, MD.

Last summer, 25-year-old Roendy Granillo died of heat stroke while he installed flooring in a house in Melissa, Texas, just north of Dallas. His tragic and entirely preventable death marked a turning point in advocacy efforts to pass a rest break ordinance for local construction workers.