Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

While silicosis-related deaths have declined, it remains a serious occupational health risk and one that requires continued public health attention, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Not an “accident”: Norberto Galicia Romero, 49, suffers fatal work-related injury in Marrietta, GA

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on February 16, 2015 in Marrietta, GA.

Humanely treated: I care about chickens, but more about people

I’ve got to believe that someone who wants to know that the chicken they’re about to eat was humanely treated would want to know the same thing about the workers who slaughtered and packaged that poultry.

March 1979 Washington Post: “Some Hair Dryers Give Off Asbestos”

Learning about a hairdresser with asbestos-related cancer made me curious about my circa 1980 hair dryer.

Not an “accident”: Marvis L. Myers, 31 suffers fatal work-related injury in Columbia, SC

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the U.S. This one occurred on February 6, 2015 in Columbia, SC.

Businessman’s problem: Workers can’t keep up with the machines

The story was about US immigration policy, but my-oh-my what it said about working conditions in poultry processing plants.

Injuries and deaths on minds of striking Steelworkers

Delayed maintenance, production pressure and fatigue from too much overtime are factors that compromise workplace safety. These are some of the issues Steelworkers have on the bargaining table during the union’s biggest strike in 35 years.

Not an “accident”: Jason Strycharz, 40, suffers fatal work-related injury in Middletown, CT

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the U.S. This one occurred on January 23, 2015 in Middletown, CT.

In the week before his 2015 State of the Union address, President Obama took modest but important steps toward expanding US workers’ access to paid sick and family leave.

If you’re in the market for a paint remover and head to your local hardware store, most of the products you’re likely to find will contain methylene chloride. These products carry hazard warnings that say “Danger!” and “Poison” along with cautionary statements about the chemical’s nervous system effects and the possibility that exposure can cause blindness, birth defects, cancer and respiratory harm. But there’s little – if anything – to suggest such products are so hazardous that they were responsible for at least 14 deaths in the United States between 2000 and 2011. These products are banned in the EU. Are there alternatives and why are they still for sale in the U.S.?