Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

Occupational Health News Roundup

The Center for Public Integrity investigates occupational illness and the workers’ compensation system; federal officials accuse coal mining operator of worker retaliation; OSHA penalties finally rise to meet inflation; and low-wage workers go on strike across the nation for better wages.

Public health researchers, activists gather for 143rd annual meeting: Highlights from Day 3

As “the water cooler for the public health crowd,” The Pump Handle is in Chicago reporting from the 143rd annual meeting of the American Public Health Association. Here are some highlights from yesterday’s events, including the intersection between social justice and public health, efforts by nurses in California to address work-related assaults, and community interventions to raise health babies.

Trial of Mining CEO Blankenship: Quotes from Week 4

The criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship went into its fourth week. Jurors heard from Chris Blanchard, the former president of Massey Energy’s Performance Coal Company about his and Blankenship’s oversight of the Upper Big Branch mine.

Flame retardants aren’t just found in your furniture. It’s likely you also have detectable amounts of the chemical in your body too, which is pretty worrisome considering the growing amount of research connecting flame retardants to serious health risks. Researchers have linked to the chemicals to reproductive health problems, adverse neurobehavioral development in kids, and endocrine and thyroid disruption. And so the question arises: Do the risks of today’s flame retardants outweigh the benefits?

Injured at work? ProPublic & NPR examine what’s worse than workers’ compensation

ProPublica and National Public Radio examine “injury benefit plans.” They are set up by some employers in Texas and Oklahoma as alternatives for firms that are allowed to opt-out of having workers’ compensation insurance.

Americans with lower incomes and educational attainment often live shorter, sicker lives than their wealthier, more educated counterparts. Contributors to these disparities can include access to care, hazardous living conditions, nutrition in early childhood, and personal behaviors. But what about workplace conditions? Do certain groups of people get sorted into jobs that exacerbate inequalities in life expectancy?

“Tired of getting knocked on the head”

A worker’s ingenuity helps to prevent a dumpster-related injury.

When it comes to protecting workers, advocates often turn to science. Whether it’s research on the effectiveness of an intervention, new injury surveillance data or novel methods for pinpointing particularly vulnerable workers, science is key to advancing workplace safety. In our fourth edition of “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety,” we highlight some of the most interesting and noteworthy research of the past year.

Paid sick leave, new rights for temp workers, and extending OSHA protections to public sector employees were among the many victories that unfolded at the state and local levels in the last 12 months and that we highlight in this year’s edition of “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety.”

More than 1,000 U.S. workers have died due to job-related events in the first seven months of 2015, according to new data from the U.S. Worker Fatality Database. Researchers estimate that total fatalities will likely reach 4,500 by the end of the year, which would mean that the nation’s occupational death rate experienced little, if no, improvement over previous years.