Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

Safety board member sneers at recommendations for improved safety regulations

A member of the Chemical Safety Board—an agency established to make recommendations to OSHA and EPA—-has a troubling view about regulations.

“Code Silver”: Beware of violent hospital patients, visitors

In a hospital “Code Blue” will shift staff into high gear. “Code Silver” will get their adrenaline pumping, too, but for a very different reason.

Fatal work injury that killed Jason Strycharz was preventable, OSHA cites Kloeckner Metals

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Jason Strycharz, 40 could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

A key argument in the movement to expand sick leave to all workers is that such policies help curb the spread of contagious diseases. And there are few workplaces where that concept is more important than in health care settings, where common diseases can be especially dangerous for patients with compromised immune systems. However, a new study finds that despite such risks, doctors and nurses still feel pressured to report to work while sick.

No OSHA citations for fatal work injury that killed Ernesto Rodriguez at Oklahoma fracking site

The OSHA inspection following the work-related death in Oklahoma of Ernesto Rodriguez did not result in any citations. A FOIA request of records from the inspection shed little light on why it happened.

A common hurdle in the field of occupational health and safety is delivering what can sometimes be life-saving information to the people who need it most. After all, not all employers are amenable to workplace health and safety education. But what if safety advocates could find and connect with the most at-risk workers out in the community? Perhaps even reach vulnerable workers with safety education before they experience an injury at work?

Not an “accident”: “John Doe” suffers fatal work-related injury in West Carrollton, Ohio

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on May 30, 2015 in West Carrollton, Ohio

After 18 years as a professional house cleaner in the suburbs of Chicago, Magdalena Zylinska says she feels very lucky. Unlike many of her fellow domestic workers, she hasn’t sustained any serious injuries.

Kudos to Sarah Maslin Nir for shedding light on the working conditions faced by nail salon workers in her recent two-part New York Times exposé “Perfect Nails, Poisoned Workers.”

The Department of Labor proposes a new rule to help miners with black lung disease; federal lawmakers introduce new hike to the minimum wage; worker safety outreach in Houston highlights the impact of new reporting rules; and a new museum is opening in honor of coal miners.