Occupational Health & Safety

Category archives for Occupational Health & Safety

Flavoring chemicals may taste yummy but still damaging lungs of workers making food

A recently published study demonstrates (again) the serious risk to workers’ health when exposed to common food-flavoring agents. The risk has been known for more than a decade. It’s just another example of our ineffective systems for protecting workers, consumers and the environment from chemical hazards.

Poultry industry says it’s being “framed as poster boy for unsafe workplaces”

The poultry industry must have its head stuck in the chicken coop. With Thanksgiving nearly upon us, the industry is trying to convince the public that poultry-processing plants are great places to earn a living. The facts tell us something different.

Public health research and advocacy, not mutually exclusive

My public health colleague, Adam Finkel, ScD, MPP, received the 2013 Alumni Leadership award from the Harvard School of Public Health. He challenges the assertion that scientists and researchers are supposed to be ‘neutral,’ not advocates.

How much more evidence does Secretary Vilsack need before he scraps the USDA’s ill-conceived proposal to “modernize” the poultry slaughter inspection process?

Thou dost protest too much. Let the disclosure chips fall where they may

The worlds of Georgia-Pacific, asbestos-litigation, scientific journals, and OSHA all fell together last week under the umbrella of transparency and disclosure.

On October 17, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) announced that it has classified air pollution as a human carcinogen. Although the composition of air pollution and exposure levels vary widely from place to place, IARC says its assessment is applicable worldwide and notes that exposures in rapidly industrializing countries…

Occupational Health News Roundup

As the Mine Safety & Health Administration furloughs employees, three mineworkers were killed on the job in three days; OSHA issues fines in West Fertilizer explosion case; and another Bangladesh factory fire kills nine workers.

Working in clouds of dust. If it’s silica, it’s not safe.

Construction crews working in a cloud of dust takes place thousands of times every day in the U.S. Here’s just one example from my community.

For older workers, the most dangerous occupational move may be getting behind the wheel.

In their efforts to protect the most vulnerable workers from illegal workplace practices and conditions, worker centers have now attracted the million-dollar ire of formidable anti-union forces. And while advocates say it’s a sign of worker centers’ success, it’s still a worrisome trend that’s made it all the way to the halls of Congress.