OSHA

Category archives for OSHA

Occupational Health News Roundup

Labor unions are becoming de facto immigrant rights groups; Trump pick to head MSHA is a former coal executive; Cal/OSHA opens more investigations into Goodwill’s safety conditions; and a new memorial honors first responders who became ill after exposures during the World Trade Center terrorist attacks.

Typically, we like to end the annual “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety” on an uplifting note. But this time around — to be honest — that was a hard sell.

For the sixth year in a row, we present “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety,” our attempt to document the year’s highs and lows as well as the challenges ahead.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Reporters investigate the deaths of five workers at Tampa Electric; OSHA removes worker fatality information from its home page; more workers sue Fraser Shipyards for hazardous lead exposures; and the Secret Service runs out of money to pay its agents.

A Center for Progressive Reform analysis of the Trump administration’s first regulatory agenda finds delay and abandonment of dozens of rules designed to protect public health.

Occupational Health News Roundup

The feds grant billions in contracts to shipbuilders with serious worker safety lapses; Texas lawmakers want to undo an Austin initiative that protects construction workers; Chevron agrees to highest fine in Cal/OSHA history after refinery fire; and Democrats hope to ban a dangerous pesticide after EPA fails to act.

With so many threats to public health arising each month, it can be hard to catch all of them. The Union of Concerned Scientists has performed a tremendous service by producing the report Sidelining Science from Day One: How the Trump Administration Has Harmed Public Health and Safety in Its First Six Months.

Dozens of safety inspector positions in California are vacant while workplace fatalities and injuries in the state are on the rise. Cal/OSHA has had an average of 34 vacant field enforcement positions a month since July 2015, which means that more than $10 million in state-authorized funding was left unused.

OSHA throws book at contractor for trenching death. I hear lame excuses for ignoring risk

DJ Meyer died when the trench he was working in collapsed around him. OSHA has proposed a $712,000 penalty against the company. When these incidents occur, what excuses does OSHA hear from the employers?

Labor Secretary talks nominations, safe jobs at Senate hearing

I heard a few interesting things when I tuned in to listen to Labor Secretary Acosta testify before the Senate Appropriations Committee.