OSHA

Category archives for OSHA

Not an “accident”: Richard Johnson, 31, suffers fatal work-related injury in Phoenix, AZ

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the U.S. This one occurred on January 12, 2015 in Phoenix, AZ.

LPNs supervised by an EMT: Poultry company’s answer to an employee health clinic

OSHA found what I’d call medical malpractice going on at a nursing station at a Wayne Farms poultry processing plant. The agency called them on it in a letter to firm’s operations manager.

With agriculture ranked one of the most dangerous industries in the country, many Americans might be surprised to know that it’s still perfectly legal for farms to officially employ children. For years, advocates have been working to address this gaping loophole in the nation’s child labor laws, often citing children’s increased vulnerability to workplace-related injury, illness and exploitation. A new study confirms those concerns, underscoring the need to better protect the children and youth working in American fields.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Staten Island worker death highlights risks facing Latino construction workers; fight continues to ban asbestos; Minnesota minimum wage increase in jeopardy for tipped workers; and researchers look for ways to protect respiratory health among dairy farm workers.

Not an “accident”: Timothy Winding, 50, suffers fatal work-related injury in Claycomo, MO

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the U.S. This one occurred on December 30, 2014 in Claycomo, MO.

Courtney, Stephanie and Paul: three too many asbestos disease stories

Reporter David McCumber introduces us to three individuals whose lives forever changed because of asbestos exposure. There will be more of them if companies, like the ones just cited by OSHA, continue to violate asbestos regulations.

Fatal work injury that killed Elbert C. Woods was preventable, OSHA cites Cleveland Track Material

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Elbert C. Woods could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Chronic work exposure to lead and risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Individuals with chronic occupational exposure to lead have an 80 percent higher odds of developing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) than individuals who do not have the exposure.

Fatal work injury that killed Chandler Warren, 19, was preventable, Tennessee OSHA cites FedEx

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Chandler Warren could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Environmental stewardship policies are hip, work environment policies get a shrug

Why is it that so many companies boast about their “green” practices to protect the environment, while allowing (or creating) hazards in their employees’ work environment?