Category archives for Regulation

Safety advocates say, if done right, this has potential to improve process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals nationwide.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Denver Post reporters investigate the lives and deaths of Colorado’s oil and gas workers; employees from Donald Trump’s California golf club say he only wanted to hire “pretty” women; cobalt mining in Congo comes with dangerous risks for adult and child workers; and Harvard’s dining staff goes on strike for living wages.

Chemical Safety Board’s missed opportunity to build public confidence, push reforms

Charleston, WV residents lost confidence in government officials when they received conflicting information about the January 2014 contamination of their tap water. The Chemical Safety Board missed an opportunity last week to restore some of that trust.

Just 10 years ago, it wouldn’t have been possible to bring leading physicians, scientists and advocates together in a consensus on toxic chemicals and neurological disorders in children, says Maureen Swanson. But with the science increasing “exponentially,” she said the time was ripe for a concerted call to action.

Not an “accident”: Emilio Dodd, 55, suffers fatal work-related injury in Lewisville, TX

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, September 6, in Lewisville, TX

Users of asbestos in the chlor-alkali industry do not want EPA to list asbestos as one of its priority chemicals. They claim it can be used safely. The industry’s record of controlling hazards does not support their assertion.

As the EPA begins implementing the Frank Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act, the chemical industry is already busy pushing the agency to limit scrutiny of various widely used but highly toxic chemicals.

Fatal work injury that killed Harold Felton, 36, was preventable, Washington-OSHA cites Alki Construction

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Harold Felton, 36, could have been prevented had Alki Construction followed worker safety regulations.

As EPA begins work under the Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act, more striking divisions are emerging between what environmental health advocates and what chemical manufacturing and industry groups want from the law.

The most recent annual Federal OSHA evaluation report of Cal/OSHA highlights progress made in some areas, but continuing failure to meet several minimum federal benchmarks as well as requirements of California law.  The underlying causes of these ongoing problems are chronic understaffing of field compliance officers and a lack of political will in the agency’s leadership.