Category archives for Regulation

OSHA’s beryllium proposal as reality check on anti-regulatory rhetoric

I’ve been reviewing OSHA’s proposed rule to protect beryllium-exposed workers. In the agency’s 262-page Federal Register notice, I see an Administration that has gone above and beyond when it comes to assessing the proposals costs to employers.

More than 1,000 U.S. workers have died due to job-related events in the first seven months of 2015, according to new data from the U.S. Worker Fatality Database. Researchers estimate that total fatalities will likely reach 4,500 by the end of the year, which would mean that the nation’s occupational death rate experienced little, if no, improvement over previous years.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is no stranger to budget cuts — the agency is already so underfunded that it would take its inspectors nearly a century, on average, to visit every U.S. workplace at least once. In some states, it would take two centuries. Unfortunately, appropriations bills now making their way through Congress don’t bode much better for OSHA.

Workplace hazard pricing: On paying the cost of unsafe workplaces

What a liberal (me) hears from her spouse (an economist) about financial motivations to address workplace hazards.

Obama Administration takes next step to protect beryllium exposed workers

OSHA is proposing a new health standard to protect workers who are exposed to beryllium from a debilitating respiratory disease and lung cancer.

Not an “accident”: Ascencion Medina, 44 suffers fatal work-related injury in Greenville, SC

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Thursday, July 30, 2015 in Greenville, South Carolina.

Fatal work injury that killed Timothy Winding was preventable, OSHA cites KCI Inc and Ford Motor Company

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Timothy Todd Winding, 50, could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Reporters investigate worker exploitation and abuse in the H-2 visa program; U.S. labor secretary speaks out on the “on-demand” economy; recycling workers face hazardous conditions and unnecessary injury risks; and some businesses say good-bye to the raise.

Donald Rasmussen: Coal miners’ physician, humble man

Dr. Donald Rasmussen, 87, spent more than 50 years in Appalachia treating coal miners with lung disease. He was at the forefront of efforts during the 1960’s to challenge the establishment’s views that exposure to coal mine dust damaged miners’ lungs.

Safety board member sneers at recommendations for improved safety regulations

A member of the Chemical Safety Board—an agency established to make recommendations to OSHA and EPA—-has a troubling view about regulations.