Regulation

Category archives for Regulation

Occupational Health News Roundup

Former employees at the Blue Bell ice cream plant in Texas report dangerous work conditions; federal health researchers announce new study of oil field workers; Democrats propose new labor rights legislation; and North Dakota legislators announce efforts to hold big oil companies responsible for worker deaths.

Paid sick leave, new rights for temp workers, and extending OSHA protections to public sector employees were among the many victories that unfolded at the state and local levels in the last 12 months and that we highlight in this year’s edition of “The Year in U.S. Occupational Health & Safety.”

The ride-hailing mobile app Uber is desperate to prove it’s nothing more than a technology platform that connects drivers and passengers. As long as it can classify its workers as independent contractors, it can sidestep a whole host of labor and wage laws. But a court ruling issued earlier this week could open the door to change all that.

Fatal work injury that killed Norberto Romero was preventable, OSHA cites Thomas Concrete

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Norberto Romero could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Law firm’s scare tactics to poultry companies about OSHA

Myths about OSHA rules and inspections are nothing new. The latest misinformation comes from a law firm raise ire of poultry companies.

OSHA’s beryllium proposal as reality check on anti-regulatory rhetoric

I’ve been reviewing OSHA’s proposed rule to protect beryllium-exposed workers. In the agency’s 262-page Federal Register notice, I see an Administration that has gone above and beyond when it comes to assessing the proposals costs to employers.

More than 1,000 U.S. workers have died due to job-related events in the first seven months of 2015, according to new data from the U.S. Worker Fatality Database. Researchers estimate that total fatalities will likely reach 4,500 by the end of the year, which would mean that the nation’s occupational death rate experienced little, if no, improvement over previous years.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is no stranger to budget cuts — the agency is already so underfunded that it would take its inspectors nearly a century, on average, to visit every U.S. workplace at least once. In some states, it would take two centuries. Unfortunately, appropriations bills now making their way through Congress don’t bode much better for OSHA.

Workplace hazard pricing: On paying the cost of unsafe workplaces

What a liberal (me) hears from her spouse (an economist) about financial motivations to address workplace hazards.

Obama Administration takes next step to protect beryllium exposed workers

OSHA is proposing a new health standard to protect workers who are exposed to beryllium from a debilitating respiratory disease and lung cancer.