Research

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For the first time in more than two decades, U.S. life expectancy has dropped.

More than 2 million U.S. adults may be living with workplace-related asthma, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The percentage of Americans who reported cost-related barriers to health care dropped from 37 percent in 2013 to 33 percent in 2016 — a change that directly corresponds to insurance expansions under the Affordable Care Act, a new study reports. On the flip side, Americans are still more likely than peers in other high-income nations to face financial obstacles to health care.

In 2005, Florida legislators passed the nation’s first “Stand Your Ground” law, expanding legal immunity for residents to use lethal force when they believe they’re being threatened. A decade later, a new study finds that Florida has experienced a significant increase in homicides, while states without such laws have not.

More and more of America’s adolescents and young adults are struggling with depression, especially young women, according to a study released earlier this week.

Highlights from final day at APHA’s Annual Meeting

The final day at the APHA annual meeting featured speakers addressing long-acting reversible contraceptives, examining news coverage of health, and connecting farmers’ markets to people receiving food assistance.

APHA adopts policies on minimum wage, fluorinated chemicals at annual meeting

The American Public Health Association adopted 11 new policy statements at its annual meeting which will guide the organization’s advocacy work in the coming years.

More news from APHA’s Annual Meeting and Expo in Denver

Public health approaches to gun violence, human trafficking, and hundreds of other topics were explored on Tuesday at the APHA Annual Meeting.

While health policy hasn’t been at the forefront of this year’s presidential election, the next person to sit in the White House could have a transformative effect on health care access, affordability and inequity. Of course, with so many variables in play, it’s hard to predict what either candidate could realistically accomplish on the health care front. However, a new report might provide some insightful clues.

In troubling public health news, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported just yesterday that combined cases of gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia in the U.S. have climbed to the highest number on record.