Safety

Category archives for Safety

Shareholders push DuPont on worker safety, not $130 billion merger

DuPont’s Board of Directors were challenged by shareholders to address the firm’s defective worker safety program.

Occupational Health News Roundup

CDC investigates diacetyl exposure in coffee production facilities; Supreme Court rules in favor of workers’ First Amendment rights; Latino workers still face the greatest fatality risks at work; and a job-seeking experiment finds women bear the brunt of age discrimination in the job market.

Fatal work injury that killed Tim Cooper, 49, was preventable, OSHA cites Independence Tube

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Tim Cooper, 49, could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Vicious attacks: 80,000 US healthcare workers assaulted in a year

Healthcare workers are the most assaulted workers in the US. A report from the Government Accountability Office provides the numbers, notes which states have laws on the books to address the problem, and highlights the modest actions taken to-date by federal OSHA.

Not an “accident”: Joshua Halphin, 25 suffers fatal work-related injury in Springfield, MO

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Thursday, March 24 in Springfield, MO.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Reveal investigates fraud in California’s workers’ comp system; workers face unnecessary hazards in the recycling industry; anger over union exemptions in Los Angeles’ new minimum wage law; and two miners win their retaliation case against Murray Energy.

Occupational Health News Roundup

A peek inside the life of Miami’s hotel housekeepers during spring break; a tie vote at the Supreme Court is a win for labor unions; California on track to adopt statewide minimum wage of $15; and Los Angeles nurses go on strike for safer working conditions.

Yearning for the footnotes: OSHA report on amputations, severe injuries

A new OSHA report recaps the agency’s first year receiving reports of amputations and hospitalizations. OSHA shields the companies from scrutiny by not mentioning their names.

In another example of the value of investing in public health, a recent study finds that PulseNet, a national foodborne illness outbreak network, prevents about 276,000 illnesses every year, which translates into savings of $507 million in medical costs and lost productivity. That’s a pretty big return on investment for a system that costs just $7.3 million annually to operate.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Vox explores the mental health impact of medical errors on health care workers; California policymaker announces efforts to protect women janitors from sexual assault; farmworkers call on fast food chain Wendy’s to join the Fair Food Program for better wages; and a judge upholds a worker’s social media rights.