Transportation

Category archives for Transportation

For older workers, the most dangerous occupational move may be getting behind the wheel.

When most of us pass by a new high-rise or drive down a new road, we rarely think: Did the builders and planners consider my health? However, a new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers evidence that certain types of land use and transportation decisions can indeed limit the human health and environmental impacts of development.

Security cameras in taxicabs, not partitions, reduce homicide rates for cab drivers

The risk of homicide is higher for taxicab drivers than for most other occupations. A new study finds that surveillance cameras mounted inside the cabs substantially reduce the drivers’ risk of homicide.

Happy Bike to Work Day!

For more safe bicycle commuting, cities should invest in bicycling infrastructure and enforce safety rules.

Death on the Job report: US workers deserve better protections

The AFL-CIO’s “Death on the Job” report shows why U.S. workers deserve much better protections than they are getting.

If you’ve followed the link from the New York Times Magazine’s letters page, welcome to The Pump Handle!

A new Brookings report finds that intercity rail ridership is growing faster than other travel modes, but Amtrak is essentially two distinct systems — one thriving, the other not.

New DOT policy promises better health and safety protections for flight attendants

After three decades, the FAA has finally acknowledged that its regulations to protect the health and safety of flight attendants are not adequate. A new policy—barring major objections from the airlines—-will extend OSHA protections to airline flight attendants.

There are two ways to reduce fatalities from vehicle crashes: prevent crashes, and make the ones that happen less deadly.

Trying to avoid the “cancer-causing” label, diesel manufacturers join the club

An expert panel convened by the WHO’s Int’l Agency for Research on Cancer is evaluating the scientific evidence on the carcinogenicity of diesel exhaust. In preparation for the meeting, diesel engine manufacturers, oil companies and mining firms hired consultants to re-analyze and critique the epidemiological studies conducted by others to manufacturer doubt about