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Researchers analyze crash data following London’s 2003 implementation of a congestion-charge zone, while Seattle reduces transit fares for low-income riders.

Glimmer of hope for beleaguered Chemical Safety Board

After four hours of testimony on retaliation against employees, abuse of power and more, there was a glimmer of hope from new leadership at the Chemical Safety Board.

Not an “accident”: Alejandro Anguiana, 41, suffers fatal work-related injury in Kingsbury, IN

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on March 6, 2015 in Kingsbury, IN.

Occupational Health News Roundup

OSHA releases new report on injury, inequality and workers’ compensation; fast food sues to stop Seattle minimum wage increase; California lawmaker proposes fund for farmworker health; and federal employees can sue for late payments during the government shutdown.

Recent pieces address the 50-year-old Older Americans Act, Ebola’s lasting impact on maternal health, day laborers’ fights for fair treatment, and more.

In Boston, you’re never too far away from a Dunkin’ Donuts. In fact, the Massachusetts-based company inspires a fiery sense of loyalty in many Bostonians. It’s kind of hard to give up the city’s ubiquitous fast food staple, but Paul Drake is committed.

NPR and ProPublic provide reality check on US workers’ comp system

Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes use the experiences of injured workers as a reality check on the US workers’ compensation system.

Congress squeezes Obama’s reg czar about lack of transparency

Testifying before the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform, OIRA chief Howard Shelanski was criticized from both sides of the aisle for his office’s lack of transparency in handling reviews of agencies’ regulatory actions.

PEPFAR, abstinence, and evidence

Stanford medical student Nathan Lo reportedly caused a stir at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week when he presented a new finding: After analyzing surveys completed by 800,000 people in 22 sub-Saharan African countries, Lo and his colleagues found “no evidence to suggest that PEPFAR funding of abstinence and faithfulness programs results in reduced high-risk sexual behavior.”

The public health literature is pretty clear when it comes to income status and poverty and their profound effects on health, disability, disease and life expectancy. But what about income inequality? Does a rising gap in wealth and resource distribution affect people’s health too?