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Even though farmworkers face serious hazards on the job and work in one of the most dangerous industries in the country, most young farmworkers in a recent study rated their work safety climate as “poor.” In fact, more than a third of those surveyed said their managers were only interested in getting the job done as quickly as possible.

Perspective on TPP in an unlikely place—a medical journal

A new take on TPP, which appears in the New England Journal of Medicine, gives me another reason to give the TPP a thumbs down.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Historic agreement reached between farmworkers and agribusiness in Baja California; New York fast food workers testify in support of higher wages; Cal-OSHA to strengthen its heat exposure oversight; and labor advocates say an upcoming visit from Pope Francis could be a boost for workers.

Fatal work injury that killed Richard Johnson was preventable, Arizona OSHA cites Southwest Fabrication

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Richard Johnson, 31, could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Oregon’s House and Senate have passed a bill requiring businesses with 10 or more employees to let their workers earn paid sick time. If the Governor signs it as expected, Oregon will be the fourth state with a paid-sick-days law. Will New Jersey be next?

The science on the health effects of fracking is still very much emerging. Oftentimes, the growing body of research can’t make a conclusive link between the drilling technique and negative health impacts, but it certainly makes the case that more research is needed. Earlier this month, another study joined the pack.

Fatal work injury that killed John Dunnivant was preventable, OSHA cites Kia Motors

The fatal work-related injuries that killed John Dunnivant, 57, could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

“All response is local” is a commonly heard phrase among public health practitioners who serve on the front lines of disease outbreaks, emergencies and disasters. Whether it’s a measles outbreak, a terrorist attack or a hurricane, public health agencies are at the ready to deploy an emergency response infrastructure designed for one overriding purpose: to protect their communities against preventable disease and injury.

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health held its national safety conference last week in Baltimore, Maryland. This recap includes comments from OSHA administrator Jordan Barab, national reporters, and advocates who participated.

At least 50 cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome have been diagnosed in South Korea, where a 68-year-old man who recently traveled to the Middle East visited four hopsitals before being diagnosed.