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Not an “accident”: Davide Nascimento, 28, suffers fatal work-related injury in Longmeadow, MA

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, July 31, in Longmeadow, Massachusetts.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is no stranger to budget cuts — the agency is already so underfunded that it would take its inspectors nearly a century, on average, to visit every U.S. workplace at least once. In some states, it would take two centuries. Unfortunately, appropriations bills now making their way through Congress don’t bode much better for OSHA.

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has published an early release of findings on US health insurance coverage from January – March 2015, and the numbers show a continued decline in the number of US residents without health insurance. The report presents findings from the National Health Insurance Survey, and the headline estimate is…

Occupational Health News Roundup

Republican proposal to ban unions at the IRS could mean trouble for other federal employees; ExxonMobil refinery in California cited for violations in February explosion; OSHA fines poultry company for “outrageously dangerous” conditions; and a strip club dancer calls for the same protections and respect afforded to other workers.

Protecting kids is another reason that OSHA regulations are important

There are plenty of lawmakers who criticize OSHA regulations. Perhaps some of them might think differently if they realized the importance of workplace safety regulations for children’s health.

One of the big criticisms that opponents of the Affordable Care Act love to trot out is its impact on the economy — one phrase you often hear is “job killer.” In fact, in 2011, Republicans in the House actually introduced legislation officially titled “Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act.” That bill didn’t make it far. However, a new report finds that “job-killing” isn’t just hyperbole; it’s just plain wrong.

Recent pieces address why only the rich can afford to write about poverty, the crisis in federal funding for family planning, CDC’s plea for funding to address antibiotic resistance, and how San Francisco politics make its housing so unaffordable.

Workplace hazard pricing: On paying the cost of unsafe workplaces

What a liberal (me) hears from her spouse (an economist) about financial motivations to address workplace hazards.

Obama Administration takes next step to protect beryllium exposed workers

OSHA is proposing a new health standard to protect workers who are exposed to beryllium from a debilitating respiratory disease and lung cancer.

Not an “accident”: Ascencion Medina, 44 suffers fatal work-related injury in Greenville, SC

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Thursday, July 30, 2015 in Greenville, South Carolina.