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Decreased lung function, breast cancer, miscarriage, depression and neurological disease. These are just a few of the health and disease risks that salon workers disproportionately face while on the job, according to a new report on the impact of toxic chemicals within the beauty and personal care industry.

50,000 US veterans are homeless

The Obama Administration set a goal of ending homelessness among veterans in 2015. This Veterans’ Day, they are about 50,000 veterans away from that goal.

Listen in on small businesses discussing draft OSHA infection control regulation

A select group of small business representatives will meet with OSHA this week to discuss a possible new regulation to protect workers from infectious diseases. OSHA has been convening these panels since 1997, but it will be the first time that we’ll be able to listen in on the discussion.

In the span of just a couple years, five of Heather Buren’s colleagues at the San Francisco Fire Department were diagnosed with breast cancer. At first, Buren thought the diagnoses were part of the unfortunate toll that comes with age. Still, something felt amiss — “it just felt so disproportionate to me,” she said.

Twice as many work-related skull fractures than government estimate

Michigan State University researchers Ken Rosenman, MD and Joanna Kica, MPA provide a reality check on the incidence of work-related skull fractures.

Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014 features two pieces that remind us how public-health interventions can become less effective if we as a society don’t use them effectively

Occupational Health News Roundup

Dangerous workplace speedups a hidden side of the economic recovery; California recycling workers vote to unionize; emergency responders in west Texas face new challenges during energy boom; and the U.S. lags in eliminating the gender pay gap.

Not an “accident”: Milton Hernandez, 22 suffers fatal work-related injury in Scott, Louisiana

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the U.S. This one occurred on October 28 in Scott, Louisiana.

A recent study of air quality around unconventional oil and gas extraction sites — more commonly referred to as fracking — found high levels of benzene, hydrogen sulfide and formaldehyde, all of which pose risks to human health. But what makes this study particularly interesting is that the air samples were collected by the very people who live near the extraction sites, and the collection times were specifically triggered by the onset of health symptoms.

Wayne Farms slammed by OSHA for gaming system on poultry worker injuries

After more than a decade, OSHA used its “general duty clause” to issue citations to a poultry processing firm for ergonomic hazards.