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Fatal work injury that killed Eric McClellan was preventable, Virginia-OSHA cites Reynolds Metals

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Eric McClellan could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Hospital lab technicians’ breast cancer deemed work-related

Canada’s Supreme Court ruled on June 24 that breast cancer can be considered work-related under the country’s workers’ compensation law. Three women who were employed as lab technicians at a hospital in British Columbia argued that the hormone-mimicking chemicals in their workplace was a factor in developing breast cancer.

A couple months ago, we reported on a study that found raising the minimum wage to $15 could have prevented thousands of premature deaths in New York City alone. Now comes more science on the life-saving benefits of higher wages — this one found that just a modest increase in the minimum wage could have saved the lives of hundreds of babies. It’s yet another reminder that the movement for a living wage is also a movement toward a healthier nation for all.

A puzzling OSHA regulatory agenda for last 6 months of Obama term

OSHA added five new topics to its regulatory agenda despite being tardy completing its current rulemaking activities. Reading the agenda brings several questions to mind.

Obama calls out asbestos at TSCA signing ceremony

President Obama called out asbestos as the key example of why the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act is needed. He signed it into law today.

Occupational Health News Roundup

An in-depth look at how lobbyists squashed an Illinois bill to prevent discriminatory hiring practices in the temp industry; thousands of coal miners in Kentucky rally to save their health benefits and pensions; Chicago gets closer to a sick leave ordinance; and two workers lose their lives in the Bakken oil fields in the span of a few days.

Researchers report encouraging initial results from a program designed to reduce cathether-associated urinary tract infections at hospitals nationwide.

The Donald ignorant on public health, too: Asbestos widow schools Trump about the “magic mineral”

Donald Trump is ignorant about many things and we can add asbestos to the list. Linda Reinstein’s husband died too young from cancer caused by asbestos. She schools Trump about exposure to the deadly mineral.

The road toward eliminating the threat of asbestos has been long, slow-moving, incredibly frustrating and littered with significant hurdles. Thankfully, advocates like Linda Reinstein, who lost her husband to asbestos-related disease in 2003, refuse to get discouraged.

Fatal work injury that killed Kenneth Schultz was preventable, Cal-OSHA cites Labor Ready

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Kenneth Schultz could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.