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Who’s saying what about OSHA’s new silica standard

Here are some of my favorite quotes in response to OSHA publishing a final rule on silica dust.

Here’s what states get when they expand Medicaid: more savings, more revenue, more jobs, more access to care for their communities.

“Sorry it took so long”: OSHA issues rule to protect workers exposed to silica dust

JT Knuckles was 58 years old when he died from silicosis in 1998. I’m remembering him today as OSHA announces a new regulation to protect silica-exposed workers.

A recent study finds vaccine refusals have, indeed, accelerated the resurgence of whooping cough and measles here in the U.S. The findings are making headlines around the country — and comment sections are filling up with vitriol from anti-vaxxers — but it would feel amiss not to highlight the study on a blog dedicated to public health. But first, let’s remind ourselves of the pain and suffering that preceded vaccines.

Recent stories address prescribing by doctors paid by drug companies; excessive lead levels in nearly 2,000 US water systems; how to understand candidates’ claims about health insurance reforms; and more.

Yearning for the footnotes: OSHA report on amputations, severe injuries

A new OSHA report recaps the agency’s first year receiving reports of amputations and hospitalizations. OSHA shields the companies from scrutiny by not mentioning their names.

In another example of the value of investing in public health, a recent study finds that PulseNet, a national foodborne illness outbreak network, prevents about 276,000 illnesses every year, which translates into savings of $507 million in medical costs and lost productivity. That’s a pretty big return on investment for a system that costs just $7.3 million annually to operate.

Obama’s regulatory czar and (sort of) transparency

President Obama’s regulatory czar testified before Congress on Tuesday and proclaimed the transparency of his office’s operations. His claims about disclosures of private meetings don’t jive with my experience.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Vox explores the mental health impact of medical errors on health care workers; California policymaker announces efforts to protect women janitors from sexual assault; farmworkers call on fast food chain Wendy’s to join the Fair Food Program for better wages; and a judge upholds a worker’s social media rights.

Not an “accident”: Albert James Speed, 25 suffers fatal work-related injury in McCalla, AL

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, March 4 in McCalla, AL.