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Is OSHA expecting too little from violators?

One year an amputated foot. Another year two amputated legs. Could OSHA’s deal after the first incident done more to prevent the second one?

Kudos to open government groups for new FOIA law

Our democracy is much stronger when watchdogs have access to agency records to expose mismanagement, ineptitude, and abuse of power. Kudos to advocates and lawmakers who persisted in making improvements to FOIA.

Mining is one of the most dangerous jobs in America, with more than 600 workers dying in fatal workplace incidents between 2004 and the beginning of July. And many more miners die long after they’ve left the mines from occupational illnesses such as black lung disease, while others live with the debilitating aftermath of workplace injuries. Today, researchers know a great deal about the health risks miners face on the job, but some pretty big gaps remain.

When a group of researchers supported by the HHS Office on Women’s Health set about designing a weight-loss intervention for lesbian and bisexual LB women, they ran into a challenge: Many lesbian and bisexual women are averse to the idea of weight loss.

In 2005, the World Health Assembly adopted a revised version of its International Health Regulations, a legally binding treaty among 196 nations to boost global health security and strengthen the world’s capacity to confront serious disease threats such as Ebola and SARS. A decade later, just one-third of countries have the ability to respond to a public health emergency. That’s why Rebecca Katz thinks it’s time to get creative.

Gun violence epidemic: let’s try a public health approach

Addressing violence requires looking upstream at social determinants of health, including racism and economic inequality. It’s the uncomfortable task we continue to avoid.

The 5-3 Supreme Court decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt last week was a welcome step for women’s health, but resulted in the removal of only some of the barriers many US women still face in accessing abortion services.

Higher OSHA penalties ahead, discounts on danger remain

Congress fixed a loophole and OSHA penalties will now be adjusted regularly to account for inflation. But if Labor Secretary Perez is serious about leveling the playing field for those who follow the law, he should consider what’s being called OSHA’s “discount on death.”

Three railroad workers were killed on June 29 when two BNSF locomotives crashed head-on into each other. “Positive train control” could have prevented the collision, but regulatory deadlines were delayed by industry lobbying.

Detroit Free Press reporters investigate Michigan’s flawed worker safety oversight system; workers in China’s fireworks factories face life-threatening conditions; New Mexico farmworkers win major workers’ comp victory; and OSHA rules in worker’s favor in asbestos retaliation case.