Latest / page 3

Highlights from final day at APHA’s Annual Meeting

The final day at the APHA annual meeting featured speakers addressing long-acting reversible contraceptives, examining news coverage of health, and connecting farmers’ markets to people receiving food assistance.

APHA adopts policies on minimum wage, fluorinated chemicals at annual meeting

The American Public Health Association adopted 11 new policy statements at its annual meeting which will guide the organization’s advocacy work in the coming years.

More news from APHA’s Annual Meeting and Expo in Denver

Public health approaches to gun violence, human trafficking, and hundreds of other topics were explored on Tuesday at the APHA Annual Meeting.

Thousands of public health practitioners are now at the APHA Annual Meeting in Denver, taking in new research on every public health topic imaginable.

An injunction temporarily prohibits implementation of an executive order requiring companies bidding on large federal contracts to disclose whether they’d been cited for violating labor laws in the past three years. This demonstrates a need to give businesses with safe workplaces the same kind of deference we give small businesses.

Workers’ wages in China are now deemed to be “too high” by consumer product brands seeking to “source” their products in Asia — so Vietnam has become the new “promised land” for international brands selling clothes, electronics and sports shoes, among other products. Vietnamese workers are now facing sweatshop working conditions, like Chinese workers before them, in the global corporations’ “race to the bottom” in wages, working conditions and rights.

While health policy hasn’t been at the forefront of this year’s presidential election, the next person to sit in the White House could have a transformative effect on health care access, affordability and inequity. Of course, with so many variables in play, it’s hard to predict what either candidate could realistically accomplish on the health care front. However, a new report might provide some insightful clues.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Reporters investigate the man whose research is used to deny veterans’ claims about Agent Orange exposure; former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship goes back to court to appeal his conviction; voters in five states will cast ballots on raising the minimum wage; and OSHA’s new worker retaliation rules are delayed.

Recent pieces address activism to improve the fight against tuberculosis; speaking up against sexual harassment and assault; and more.

EPA’s first major action under new TSCA highlights the law’s limitations and points to continuing role for states in protecting the public from toxic exposures.