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Recent pieces address condom innovation and approval, government handouts to the rich, online violence against women and girls, and more.

Today, nearly every state in the country has a law that bans texting while driving. But do these laws make a difference?

One in three workers have carpal tunnel syndrome at Maryland poultry plant

Yet another study tells us that poultry workers develop painful and disabling musculoskeletal injuries.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Advocates work to expand consumer concern from humanely treated food to humanely treated workers; workers with children face struggles in Silicon Valley; Texas lawmakers introduce bill aimed at fertilizer plants; Microsoft to require paid leave policies at its suppliers; and the McDonald’s wage hike is too small for too few.

Not an “accident”: Jeffrey Shannon, 49, suffers fatal work-related injury in Marcus Hook, PA

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on March 30, 2015 in Delaware County, PA.

Thanks to the federal School Breakfast Program, millions of low-income children have the opportunity to start the school day with a healthy meal. But does the program impact the brain as well as the belly? A new study finds that it does, with students at participating schools scoring higher in math, reading and science.

Important changes since Upper Big Branch disaster, but coal miner deaths continue

April 5, 2015 will mark the fifth anniversary of the Upper Big Branch mine disaster. Since then, some things have change in coal mine safety, especially by MSHA. But more than 200 US miners have died on-the-job since UBB.

Oil company uncomfortable with reminder of 35 deaths at Galveston refinery

Marathon Petroleum Company’s philosophy of corporate citizenship says one thing about safety and differing viewpoints, but it behaves differently when those topics are presented bearing the names of workplace fatality victims.

For years, advocates have been calling on policymakers to reform the nation’s outdated chemical safety laws. Today, two such bills stand before Congress — one that advocates say better protects the public’s health and another that advocates warn is a dangerous step backward.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Young v. UPS leaves it up to lower courts to decide whether UPS discriminated against Peggy Young by not giving her light duty while she was pregnant. In the meantime, new guidance from researchers can help physicians advise pregnant patients whose jobs involve lifting.