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Flame retardants aren’t just found in your furniture. It’s likely you also have detectable amounts of the chemical in your body too, which is pretty worrisome considering the growing amount of research connecting flame retardants to serious health risks. Researchers have linked to the chemicals to reproductive health problems, adverse neurobehavioral development in kids, and endocrine and thyroid disruption. And so the question arises: Do the risks of today’s flame retardants outweigh the benefits?

Not an “accident”: Kenneth Schultz, 56, suffers fatal work-related injury in Oceanside, CA

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, October 13 in Oceanside, CA

Recent pieces address the impact of soda taxes on consumption; sports’ teams approaches to preventing antibiotic-resistant infections; doctors’ responses to women’s pain; and more.

Trial of Mining CEO Blankenship: Quotes from Week 2

The criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship went into its second week. Jurors heard from former employees of the Upper Big Branch mine, the scene in 2010 of the worst coal mine disaster in 40 years.

Injured at work? ProPublic & NPR examine what’s worse than workers’ compensation

ProPublica and National Public Radio examine “injury benefit plans.” They are set up by some employers in Texas and Oklahoma as alternatives for firms that are allowed to opt-out of having workers’ compensation insurance.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Investigative series explores worker health and safety on the farm; California enacts toughest pay equity law in the country; OSHA proposes biggest fine in Nebraska’s history; and Labor Secretary Tom Perez stops by Gawker.

A bill introduced in the DC City Council would allow covered DC workers to take up to 16 weeks of paid leave in a year, at full pay for those who make up to $52,000 annually, to address their own serious medical conditions, bond with a new child, care for a seriously ill family member, or deal with deployment-related issues.

Trial of Mining CEO Blankenship: Best quotes from Week 1

The criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship commenced on October 7 with opening statements by the prosecution and defense attorneys. The following are some of my favorite excerpts pulled from Day #1’s transcript.

Earlier this week, the White House hosted a Summit on Worker Voice, welcoming organizers from more traditional labor groups, such as unions, as well as voices from new worker movements, such as Fight for $15. At the summit, President Obama spoke about wages, the power of collective action and the growing “gig” economy.

Americans with lower incomes and educational attainment often live shorter, sicker lives than their wealthier, more educated counterparts. Contributors to these disparities can include access to care, hazardous living conditions, nutrition in early childhood, and personal behaviors. But what about workplace conditions? Do certain groups of people get sorted into jobs that exacerbate inequalities in life expectancy?