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Recent pieces address the 50-year-old Older Americans Act, Ebola’s lasting impact on maternal health, day laborers’ fights for fair treatment, and more.

In Boston, you’re never too far away from a Dunkin’ Donuts. In fact, the Massachusetts-based company inspires a fiery sense of loyalty in many Bostonians. It’s kind of hard to give up the city’s ubiquitous fast food staple, but Paul Drake is committed.

NPR and ProPublic provide reality check on US workers’ comp system

Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes use the experiences of injured workers as a reality check on the US workers’ compensation system.

Congress squeezes Obama’s reg czar about lack of transparency

Testifying before the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform, OIRA chief Howard Shelanski was criticized from both sides of the aisle for his office’s lack of transparency in handling reviews of agencies’ regulatory actions.

PEPFAR, abstinence, and evidence

Stanford medical student Nathan Lo reportedly caused a stir at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week when he presented a new finding: After analyzing surveys completed by 800,000 people in 22 sub-Saharan African countries, Lo and his colleagues found “no evidence to suggest that PEPFAR funding of abstinence and faithfulness programs results in reduced high-risk sexual behavior.”

The public health literature is pretty clear when it comes to income status and poverty and their profound effects on health, disability, disease and life expectancy. But what about income inequality? Does a rising gap in wealth and resource distribution affect people’s health too?

History, art and prevention: European workplace safety posters

An historical collection of workplace safety posters from European agencies and advocates cover themes that are still relevant today.

“Established by the state.” Those are the four words at the center of an upcoming Supreme Court case that could strip affordable health insurance coverage from millions of working families and result in billions of dollars in uncompensated care costs.

Not an “accident”: John P. Stoll, 58, suffers fatal work-related injury in Madison, WI

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on February 20, 2015 in Madison, WI.

Highs and lows of Labor Department websites

MSHA continues to develop new ways for the public to access its enforcement data, while parts of OSHA’s website have been “temporarily unavailable” since early this year.