Medicaid expansion

Tag archives for Medicaid expansion

New estimates from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics show the uninsurance rate has continued to decline — but actions in some states threaten Medicaid expansion gains.

A new study in MMWR reports that 25.7% of US adults have been diagnosed with multiple chronic conditions. Three of the states with the highest prevalence of multiple chronic conditions haven’t accepted the Medicaid expansion, and one that expanded Medicaid may drop it.

Everything’s bigger in Texas — including the number of Texans without health insurance. But thanks to the Affordable Care Act, the percentage of uninsured Texas residents has dropped by 30 percent. That means the Texas uninsured rate has hit its lowest point in nearly two decades.

Here’s what states get when they expand Medicaid: more savings, more revenue, more jobs, more access to care for their communities.

More good news from the Affordable Care Act: Since it became the law of the land, uninsurance disparities between white, black and Hispanic residents have narrowed significantly.

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has published an early release of findings on US health insurance coverage from January – March 2015, and the numbers show a continued decline in the number of US residents without health insurance. The report presents findings from the National Health Insurance Survey, and the headline estimate is…

More than $30 million in Arkansas, $25.8 million in Kentucky, $105.5 million in Washington and $180 million in Michigan. That’s how much money just four states during just one fiscal year saved under their newly expanded Medicaid programs.

Coverage, access, and outcomes: Oregon’s Medicaid experiments

by Liz Borkowski. Now that it’s 2014, millions more people in the US have health insurance coverage (either Medicaid or private insurance), thanks to the Affordable Care Act. Two different Medicaid efforts in Oregon hold lessons about what it might take to turn expanded insurance coverage into better health outcomes.

As Healthcare.gov welcomes enrollees for 2015 health-insurance plans, we’re seeing far fewer technical problems, modest premium increases overall (but not everywhere), and a continued lack of affordable options for those in the “coverage gap.”

US uninsured rate sinks to new low

New findings from CDC’s National Health Interview Survey show the uninsured rate at its lowest level since the agency started tracking this statistic 17 years ago.