The Thoughtful Animal

The Vision of Scienceblogs

Did you know that Scienceblogs has a vision statement? It might be hard to find. You have to scroll alllllllll the way down to the very bottom of any page on the network, and click About Scienceblogs.

Here is what it says:

Science is driving our conversation unlike ever before.

From climate change to intelligent design, HIV/AIDS to stem cells, science education to space exploration, science is figuring prominently in our discussions of politics, religion, philosophy, business and the arts. New insights and discoveries in neuroscience, theoretical physics and genetics are revolutionizing our understanding of who are are, where we come from and where we’re heading. Launched in January 2006, ScienceBlogs is a portal to this global dialogue, a digital science salon featuring the leading bloggers from a wide array of scientific disciplines. Today, ScienceBlogs is the largest online community dedicated to science.

We believe in providing our bloggers with the freedom to exercise their own editorial and creative instincts. We do not edit their work and we do not tell them what to write about.

We have selected our 80+ bloggers based on their originality, insight, talent, and dedication and how we think they would contribute to the discussion at ScienceBlogs. Our role, as we see it, is to create and continue to improve this forum for discussion, and to ensure that the rich dialogue that takes place at ScienceBlogs resonates outside the blogosphere.

ScienceBlogs is very much an experiment in science communication, and being first also means being first to encounter unforeseen obstacles. We are learning as we go (and as goes the blogosphere) and appreciate your understanding and patience.

ScienceBlogs was created by Seed Media Group. We believe that science literacy is a pre-condition for progress in the 21st century. At a time when public interest in science is high but public understanding of science remains weak, we have set out to create innovative media ventures to improve science literacy and to advance global science culture.

There’s nothing terribly offensive here. In fact, I think its pretty fantastic. So, when an institution (whether for-profit or non-profit, new media or old media, or whatever) errs or falters, a reasonable thing to do – in fact, the very reason that vision statements are necessary – is to return to the vision statement. Has the institution strayed too far from its intended mission? If so, that institution should change its course to re-align itself with its purpose. Otherwise, the institution must ask itself if it is necessary to change its vision statement.

Comments

  1. #1 anne
    July 24, 2010

    Bravo Jason and thank you.

  2. #2 fernaldo
    July 25, 2010

    It’s just a pity so many Scienceblog Bloggers had themselves a little tanty and disappeared without demonstrating any “…understanding and patience…” while Pepsico put Scienceblogs through one of its “…learning as we go…” experiences.

    Feedback in an effort to improve the environment or skip town at the first sign of trouble? Personally, I’m glad that most of my favourite blogs belong to those Bloggers with a modicum of consideration.