The Thoughtful Animal

Monkeying Around

This is a tamarind:

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The fruit pulp is edible and popular. The hard green pulp of a young fruit is considered by many to be too sour and acidic, but is often used as a component of savory dishes, as a pickling agent or as a means of making certain poisonous yams in Ghana safe for human consumption.

The ripened fruit is considered the more palatable as it becomes sweeter and less sour (acidic) as it matures. It is used in desserts as a jam, blended into juices or sweetened drinks, sorbets, ice-creams and all manner of snack. It is also consumed as a natural laxative. (via wikipedia)

This is a cotton-top tamarin:

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Cool? One is a fruit, one is a monkey.

These are Reese’s peanut butter cups:

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These delicious chocolate treats contain peanut butter.

These are rhesus monkeys (source):

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This is what I imagine a Reese’s monkey to look like:

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Cool? One is a candy, one is a monkey.

The next paper I grade or blog post I read that references “cotton-top tamarinds” or “reese’s macaques” gets a giant FAIL.

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(Want to buy this on a shirt?)

Comments

  1. #1 Flora
    July 26, 2010

    ROTFL, this post totally made my day! :-)

  2. #2 Dave Lukas
    July 26, 2010

    I didn’t glance at the title in my RSS reader so I honestly thought this was a post from the food blog I follow.

    I was very confused when I got to the part about grading papers.

  3. #3 Mike Lisieski
    July 27, 2010

    I am now hungry for monkey… or monkey-shaped cake. Both are good. Mmmmm…. Reese’s macaque…

  4. #4 Jim Thomerson
    July 29, 2010

    Adenia is a genus both of killifish and of passionflowers. How about that?

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