The Thoughtful Animal

Archives for November, 2010

An awesome video from our friends over at BBC Earth Life Is: We caught up with Richard Sorger, a hot British fashion designer who draws inspiration directly from animals and nature. As well as designing for big name celebrities his work he has also designed for Swarovski and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: Ready for some more Thanksgiving science? Brad Walters of Cortical Hemming and Hawing asks what football can tell us about decision-making: Why you should always go for it on 4th and short. The Neurocritic reports a fascinating study of a woman who had epileptic seizures…

A fun talk about sex, death and evolution at LA’s Natural History Museum. It’s free and ticketless — so please bring friends and colleagues! WHEN: Thursday, December 2, 6-7:30pm. WHERE: LA Natural History Museum in the Times Mirror Room. WHAT: Australian paleontologist John A. Long is the recently appointed vice president of research and collections…

There are only FIVE DAYS left for submissions! Dig through your archives, through other people’s archives and submit! Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail Bora the corrected URLs for your entries The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own…

Ah, Thanksgiving. A day full of turkey, cranberries, pie, and, of course, SCIENCE! After you fill your stomach with gravy and stuffing, stuff your mind with all this great Thanksgiving science. What’s any good Thanksgiving feast without some turkey? Emily Anthes of Wonderland starts the meal off with an offering of thanks for the turkey’s…

Even still, we tend to think of the turkey as a fairly unintelligent bird, skilled at little more than waddling around, emitting the occasional “gobble,” and frying up golden-brown-and-delicious. But…what if I told you that the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) could actually be quite clever, at least when it comes to social cognition? Apocryphal or…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: Sleep is really important for health and cognition among other things. But what about for memory? An interesting discussion at Psychothalamus about the relationship between sleep and remembering to remember. A fascinating post at Wiring the Brain begins with pain sensitivity in fruit flies and…

In one of a series of stories on animal intelligence, Anderson Cooper went to see Kanzi, probably the most famous bonobo in the world, and primatologist Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, who has worked with Kanzi almost his entire life. Using his board of symbolic “lexigrams,” Kanzi apparently indicated that Cooper should don a bunny suit. One wonders…

Nearly one-third of the world’s amphibian species are at risk of extinction. The rescue project aims to save more than 20 species of frogs in Panama, one of the world’s last strongholds for amphibian biodiversity. While the global amphibian crisis is the result of habitat loss, climate change and pollution, chytridiomycosis is likely at least…

Scientists thought they had a pretty good handle on the social interactions of bottlenose dophins (Tursiops). They’ve used the term fission-fusion dynamics to describe dolphin (and non-human primate) society and so far it has served researchers well. Fission-fusion societies among dolphins are characterized by two levels of social hierarchy: groups of two or three related…