The Thoughtful Animal

Archives for March, 2011

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: What should you talk about on your first date if you want a second? Not films, apparently. Find some answers at the B Good Science Blog. There is a period between “clinical death” and “brain death” called the “gap period,” during which a person may…

Welcome to part 3 of the Science Blogging 101 series. You can find part 1 here, in which I discussed my own experiences with blogging, and part 2 here, which I discussed some of the big questions regarding audience, purpose, and so forth. How do you balance blogging with the rest of your work? Do…

Watch this video and it might appear as if that beetle is being operated via remote control. But wait. IT IS. The critter is a bit of a cyborg actually – part june bug, part computer. The man behind the zombie cyborg beetles is Michel Maharbiz, an associate professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering…

Welcome to the third installment of Animal Territoriality Week. See part 1 here, and part 2 here. In 1994, a disease called sarcoptic mange swept through Bristol’s fox population, severely crippling the population and killing most of the individuals. Professor Stephen Harris of the University of Bristol, who had been studying the movements and territories…

Welcome to the second installment of Animal Territoriality Week. Today, we’ll look at a case where differences in territory size can have implications for neuroanatomy. If you missed part 1 of Animal Territoriality week, check it out here. Let’s say you have two very very closely related species. You might even call them congeneric, because…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. Embodied cognition never ceases to amaze and entertain. Mo Costandi of Neurophilosophy has the latest – Tough and tender: How touch affects sex categorization. Emily Anthes of the Wonderland blog describes an interesting paper investigating the record-keeping of Dr. Harvey Cushing. Mistakes Were Made (Inside…

Welcome to Territoriality Week! Every day this week, I’ll have a post about some aspect of animal or human territoriality. How do animals mark and control their territories? What determines the size or shape of an animal’s territory? What can an animal’s territory tell us about neuroanatomy? Today, I begin by asking two questions: first,…

A Kangaroo Is Born…Twice

The narrator laureate of the science world, David Attenborough, describes the birth of a baby grey kangaroo. Our friends at BBC Earth describe the video: In this video a kangaroo is born, crawls up to its mother’s pouch where a camera captures it’s development from tiny, naked, grub-like newborn into a fully grown Joey. It’s…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. “Whether it’s a raised eyebrow or curl of the lip, we usually think of emotions as conveyed through facial expressions and body language,” writes BPS Research Digest’s Christian Jarrett. But, how well can we communicate emotions purely through touch? A great explainer post from the…