Mammals

The Thoughtful Animal

Category archives for Mammals

Welcome to the third installment of Animal Territoriality Week. See part 1 here, and part 2 here. In 1994, a disease called sarcoptic mange swept through Bristol’s fox population, severely crippling the population and killing most of the individuals. Professor Stephen Harris of the University of Bristol, who had been studying the movements and territories…

Welcome to the second installment of Animal Territoriality Week. Today, we’ll look at a case where differences in territory size can have implications for neuroanatomy. If you missed part 1 of Animal Territoriality week, check it out here. Let’s say you have two very very closely related species. You might even call them congeneric, because…

Welcome to Territoriality Week! Every day this week, I’ll have a post about some aspect of animal or human territoriality. How do animals mark and control their territories? What determines the size or shape of an animal’s territory? What can an animal’s territory tell us about neuroanatomy? Today, I begin by asking two questions: first,…

A Kangaroo Is Born…Twice

The narrator laureate of the science world, David Attenborough, describes the birth of a baby grey kangaroo. Our friends at BBC Earth describe the video: In this video a kangaroo is born, crawls up to its mother’s pouch where a camera captures it’s development from tiny, naked, grub-like newborn into a fully grown Joey. It’s…

Dogs Can Hear How Big You Are

Lots of animals are well aware that bigger means scarier. In stressful or aggressive situations, for example, the hair or fur of chimpanzees, rats, cats, and even humans stands up on end (in humans, given our lack of fur, this results in goose bumps) in an effort to dissuade a potential attack. Elephant seals use…

There is a small bit of land, only about a square kilometer, that has added a new wrinkle to the story of animal domestication. This bit of land located in Northern Jordan, just southeast of the Sea of Galilee near the banks of the Jordan River, is home to an archaeological site known as ‘Uyun…

This Photo Needs A Caption

This photo, titled “Zookeeper Ernie Bowman and Hippopotamus, Joan, London, 1934″ comes to us via The Guardian. Comment with your best photo caption – as many as you want. Winner will get a limited edition Scienceblogs Thoughtful Animal mug. I will chose a winner in 24 hours. The photo is © 2011 Curatorial Assistance, Inc/E.O.…

Most dog owners think that their dogs can tell what they’re thinking. Or at least, in some sense, they will insist that their pet pooches can sense their emotions, and respond accordingly. Indeed, a man by the name of Karl Krall (say that three times fast) thought that there exist some sort of psychic connections…

Behold! The second installment of the Science Online Lemur Cognition series. If you missed the first installment, you should check out the cyborg lemurs of the Duke Lemur Center. There’s some pretty good evidence that numerical cognition emerged fairly early in the primate lineage, at least, if not significantly earlier in evolution. Most of the…

In honor of Science Online, which begins on Thursday night, I will be writing about lemurs this week. Why lemurs? Because on Friday morning, as a part of Science Online, I will be taking a tour of the Duke Lemur Center. It is common among animals – especially primates – to orient their gaze preferentially…