ResearchBlogging Editor's Selections

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Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. To start us off this week, Neuroskeptic discusses a new study that attempted to use a computer to translate therapists’ notes into psychiatric diagnoses. Could it be that certain language used by therapists or their clients could predict the severity or duration of a mental…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. Social hierarchies are pretty complicated to navigate…so why have them at all? Read about The Status Paradox at Psych Your Mind. ADHD well known, but how might an ADHD diagnosis interact with being an athlete? What should practitioners of sports medicine know about it? Bill…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. “Most neuroscientists would subscribe to the sensorimotor hypothesis, according to which brains mainly evaluate sensory input to compute motor output,” writes Bjorn Brembs. But is it possible that the sensorimotor hypothesis is just the result of some laboratory artifacts? “What happens to a pig if…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. Snacking on fertilized duck eggs features prominently in the first editor’s selection for this week. Food-related disgust and moral disgust: are they related? Find out at this Genealogy of Religion post, Foreign Ideas & Moral Indigestion Jon Brocks outlines a proposed change for the upcoming…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. You’re running down a corridor in a castle that’s under attack by terrorists. Or are their neuroscientists, trying to figure out just how it is that people get involved in the narrative “flow” of a video game? Neuroskeptic explains how your brain gets in on…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. The first selection this week comes from Chad Orzel at Uncertain Principles. “But wait,” you say. “A psychology post in a physics blog?” Yes! Active Engagement Works: “Improved Learning in a Large-Enrollment Physics Class” Autism diagnosis in cultural context. Dorothy Bishop reviews a recent book…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. Are you an inattentive superhero? Bradley Voytek thinks so, and explains why in this fantastic post at Oscillatory Thoughts. Does visual perception for the actions of others alter perception of the passage of time? Mo Costandi at Neurophilosophy describes a recent paper addressing this very…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. What can the spinal cord teach us about learning and memory? A lot, it seems. Bjorn Brembs has the scoop. How do box jellyfish hunt their prey? With each of their TWENTY-FOUR eyes! Mo Costandi explains at Neurophilosophy. That’s it for this week… Check back…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. To start with, is there anything that might help with exposure therapy for specific phobias? Michelle from C6-H12-O6 describes a paper that suggests that the administration of cortisol might! While many people claim to not be able to dance, if pressed, most could dance to…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: To start things off, Krystal D’Costa of Anthropology in Practice discusses the science of women’s shoes. Was the “Gay Caveman” really gay? Or even a caveman? Eric M. Johnson takes his blog tour to David Dobbs’s Neuron Culture blog: The Allure of the Gay Caveman.…