ResearchBlogging Editor's Selections

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Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: Liberals Are Conflicted and Conservatives Are Afraid and Colin Firth is published in Current Biology. From the Neurocritic. Despite what beer commercials tell you, not everyone responds to alcohol in the same way. The Science Life blog discusses the science of drinking. How does an…

Here are my Research Blogging Editors Selections for this week: Is there a relationship between the taste of certain foods and moral decision-making? Maybe. At The Jury Room: Make them eat brussel sprouts. In a somewhat related post, Dr. Stu of his eponymous blog asks if your music selection can make your food taste better…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: From Jon Brock at Cracking the Enigma: How do siblings influence theory of mind development in children with autism? Did your gut bacteria make you read this post? From Mo at Neurophilosophy: Gut bacteria may influence thoughts and behaviour. A short, but interesting, post from…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: Dr. Sharma asks, at his eponymous blog, what are the psychological effects of exercise on adolescents? M&Ms as a strategy to overcome fear of dogs. No, really. Neurocritic has the details. Doctor Zen writes, “We’re smart. Octopuses are smart. But we have different kinds of…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: What should you talk about on your first date if you want a second? Not films, apparently. Find some answers at the B Good Science Blog. There is a period between “clinical death” and “brain death” called the “gap period,” during which a person may…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. Embodied cognition never ceases to amaze and entertain. Mo Costandi of Neurophilosophy has the latest – Tough and tender: How touch affects sex categorization. Emily Anthes of the Wonderland blog describes an interesting paper investigating the record-keeping of Dr. Harvey Cushing. Mistakes Were Made (Inside…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week. “Whether it’s a raised eyebrow or curl of the lip, we usually think of emotions as conveyed through facial expressions and body language,” writes BPS Research Digest’s Christian Jarrett. But, how well can we communicate emotions purely through touch? A great explainer post from the…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: To start us off, a pair of killer posts by tag-teaming science-blogging super-duo Kate Clancy and Scicurious. First, check out The cerebellum and premenstrual dysphoric disorder at Sci’s place, and then read Kate’s take on the same research at Context and Variation. Or read Kate’s…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: I believe this is the first time I’ve featured a cartoon in my weekly editor’s selections. Learn all about the Dunning-Kruger effect at Lost in Transcription. Krystal D’Costa of Anthropology in Practice asks, Is A Kiss Ever Really Just A Kiss? and provides a nice…

Here are my Research Blogging Editor’s Selections for this week: Let’s start out with something particularly morbid (though potentially the best lede ever): “What effect do thoughts of death have on a typical person’s desire for sex?” This fascinating post by Christian Jarrett of BPS Research Digest asks, when is death an aphrodisiac? If death…