Science Communication

The Thoughtful Animal

Category archives for Science Communication

I’m on Google+. After a couple days of playing with it, I haven’t quite identified what it is for, or at least how I’m going to use it differently from twitter or facebook, but so far I am generally impressed – it’s easy, intuitive, and fast. It also allows you a level of selective privacy…

I’m working on putting together a resource sheet for various people (teachers, professors, graduate students, etc) that will help them find psychology-related resources on the web. And I can use your help. To start with, I’m compiling as extensive a list as is reasonably possible of psychology and related blogs. Here is a starter list,…

Welcome to part 3 of the Science Blogging 101 series. You can find part 1 here, in which I discussed my own experiences with blogging, and part 2 here, which I discussed some of the big questions regarding audience, purpose, and so forth. How do you balance blogging with the rest of your work? Do…

Part 2 of the n00b Science Blogging 101 series concerns the big questions of blogging: audience, purpose, and so on. You can find part 1 here, in which I discussed my own experiences with blogging to provide adequate context for this and the remaining posts in the series. What audience do you have in mind…

n00b Science Blogging 101: Part 1

Earlier today, I had the pleasure of speaking via Skype with Dan Simons‘s graduate-level science writing class. We talked about the ins and outs of academic blogging, and the nature and ecosystem of science communication online, and the students asked some terrific questions. I had asked Dan to ask his students to compile some questions…

If you’re plugged into the science blogtwitosphere, then you surely know that the topic of women science bloggers has been written about extensively. Rather than re-hash what many others have said, I’ll direct you to these posts by Kate Clancy and Daniel Lende. Then, late last night, Ed Yong wrote a post highlighting a handful…

The first proper session I attended at Science Online was I-wish-my-science-teachers-had-been-like Stacy Baker‘s workshop on Prezi. Despite some issues with the hotel wifi, it was a fantastic session, and I learned quite a bit. Clearly, there are some things better suited to Keynote/Powerpoint, and some presentations perhaps better suited to Prezi (just as they are…

I’m not sure exactly how, but somewhere between the lemurs, the books, the dinners, and the ridiculously short sleep sessions that I encountered at Science Online, I managed to learn quite a bit from many of those science writers to whose level of awesomeness I aspire, and am consequently left with a handful of scattered…

It’s here! After more than a month of reviewing, I am pleased to announce the list of posts that will be included in this year’s edition – the fifth – of The Open Laboratory! In no particular order: Givin’ props to hybrids by DeLene Beeland The decade the clones came: Beware the mighty Marmokrebs! by…

I’ve got an article that appeared in this week’s Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles about recent research from Hadassah University on the neurobiology of bilingual (English-Hebrew) reading. Is the English-reading brain somehow different from the Hebrew-reading brain? You might not expect any major differences; after all, both languages are alphabetic and are read more…