Friday Bookshelf

Thus Spake Zuska

Category archives for Friday Bookshelf

March is women’s history month, but don’t let that circumscribe your fun. You can get together with a posse of your like-minded women friends and mock mansplainers anytime. Now, I know many of you have just recently learned that there even existed a name you could attach to this annoying behavior plaguing your existence. Believe…

Picking at the Bones of a Dying Bookstore

It’s no secret bookstores have been in trouble for some time now. Small independent bookstores have been dropping like flies left and right. One of the oldest and best loved independent bookstores in Philadelphia, Robin’s, recently closed, reinvented itself, and reopened in new space above its old location. It now sells mostly used books, along…

Earlier this year I reviewed Douglas Tallamy’s Bringing Nature Home, which inspired me to convert my garden to all or mostly native plants. I swore this year would be a much better gardening year than last. Visions of gardening glory danced in my head. Ah, early spring. Now we are baking in the heat of…

Friday Bookshelf: Becoming Leaders

You’re a smart woman, and a fabulous scientist or engineer. You know you can be a great researcher or professional engineer. But have you given thought to doing more than your job – to becoming a leader? F. Mary Williams and Carolyn J. Emerson hope you will, and to encourage you, they’ve put together Becoming…

Friday Bookshelf: Gardening For Life

In the spring a suburban homeowner’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of lawn. Originally uploaded by garethjmsaunders. Fertilize! Break out the emergent herbicide! Fire up the sprinklers! Here comes the lawn mower and weed whacker! The relentless battle to maintain a time-, energy-, and resource-consuming monoculture that provides a perfect habitat for Japanese beetle grubs…

Friday Bookshelf: “On Her Own Terms”

This week’s Friday Bookshelf is actually a repeat of a blog post from the old blog site. It begins with a question: Who was Annie Montague Alexander?

What does it take to be included in The Best Science Writing 2007? Well, it helps if you write for the New Yorker or the New York Times. Eleven of 20 contributions selected for this volume originally appeared in the New Yorker or the New York Times or New York Times Magazine. It also helps…

Loathe as I am to admit it, a copy of James Watson’s historical novel The Double Helix does reside on one of my bookshelves. (Though I did purchase it in a used bookstore, so he garnered no profit from me.) As you may recall, The Double Helix, based loosely on Watson’s experiences in England at…

Three for the price of one in this week’s Friday Bookshelf! Which maybe makes up a little for the complete lack of a Friday Bookshelf last week. First up is Lynn M. Osen’s classic, originally published in 1974 and simply titled Women in Mathematics. Osen’s slim volume has been beloved – and in print –…

What is this thing called feminist science studies? Have you ever been asked that question, or perhaps asked it of yourself? You wanted a nice, short, pithy answer to hand over to your interlocutor. And yet, it’s like being asked, what is this thing called science? The subject area is huge, the topics are diverse,…