science

Thus Spake Zuska

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Question: Did you know that there are National Historic Chemical Landmarks? Answer: Yes, there are. Question: What did the American Chemical Society declare to be its first National Historic Chemical Landmark, and where can you find it? Answer: “Old Faithful”, a Bakelizer or steam pressure vessel, vintage 1909. Phenol and formaldehyde were hardened at 150…

Rules For Media Coverage of Feminists

The most excellent Dr. Isis has launched her most excellent Letters to Our Daughters project. Isis tells us The inspiration for my Letters to Our Daughters Project comes from my hope that we can recreate our family tree here, creating a forum where the mothers and aunts in our fields (which I hope to not…

Oh, linky blogosphere, how I love thee! I was just starting to browse through Atoms Arranged Meaningwise by Rachel McKinney – which I found via Scientiae’s blogroll – when her most recent post sent me shooting off to Threadbared. Rachel notes: And I know we’re supposed to be good little serious philosophers and clothes aren’t…

Tiny Shiny Keys and Gendered Language

Yesterday I was listening to Morning Edition on NPR and caught this very intriguing segment, Shakespeare Had Roses All Wrong. Would you describe a bridge as fragile, elegant, beautiful, peaceful, slender, pretty? Or as strong, dangerous, long, sturdy, big, towering? Lera Boroditsky, an assistant psychology professor at Stanford University, found that it depends – for…

A few days ago I wrote about The Problem of the Problem of Motherhood in Science, a post inspired by Meg Urry’s book review of Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory by Emily Monosson. A vigorous discussion ensued in the comments – thank you all for participating! It turns out the author of the book…

Over at Fairer Science, at the end of an excellent rant about the uselessness of one-shot workshops, Pat Campbell writes: One other thing, if I see one more article about why there aren’t more women in science that concludes “it’s the children” I am going to run amuck. This one says “Women don’t choose careers…

I love Ursula K. le Guin’s the Earthsea series, and recently finished reading the final novel, The Other Wind. Those who are familiar with the Earthsea books will know that among other topics, le Guin explores traditional gender roles, their change, and men’s disparagement of women’s power. Towards the end of The Other Wind, one…