MT The debate on genetically engineered crops (the so-called “GMOs”) has begun to grow up. Anti-GMO protests are fizzling.

Why?

Some consumers are embracing an emerging “geek consciousness” – a science-friendly approach that rejects unfounded attacks on basic and applied science and that emphasize knowledge-based agriculture instead of faith-based agriculture.

Also, genetic modification is no longer new. GM crops have been grown commercially around the world for more than a decade, and have been eaten by millions with no harm to human health or the environment. Scary health effects that were always the most potent fears for average consumers (though perhaps also the least credible) have failed to materialize.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/may/30/gm-debate-grown-up?CMP=twt_fdMT

The GM debate is growing up »

Scientists on YouTube, Frankenfood out of the headlines: Rothamsted looks like a turning point

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Comments

  1. #1 jane
    June 12, 2012

    What the heck is faith-based agriculture? Do you mean to imply that traditional agriculture is not based on knowledge, or that modern intensive organic farming methods, since their users generally shun GMOs, are not based on knowledge? If you were to try running a farm using either traditional or modern organic farming methods, you would quickly find that possession of a large body of knowledge is merely one of the requisites for success.

    • #2 Pamela Ronald
      June 13, 2012

      Agreed, possession of a large body of knowledge is an important requisite for success. Most modern farmers, whether organic or conventional, use the best tools available to them. However, for organic ag, some of the newest tools, including genetically engineered seed, are not available to these farmers. The reason for this prohibition is not based on knowledge of sustainable agriculture