organic farming

Tag archives for organic farming

The Economist is running an online debate and we need your vote. Vote here. My opening statement: The number of people on Earth is expected to increase from the current 6.7 billion to 9 billion by 2050 with food demands expected to rise by 70%. How will we feed them? If we continue with current…

The most devastating impact on biodiversity is caused by agriculture. Farming is already the greatest extinction threat to birds, and its adverse impacts look set to increase, especially in developing countries (Green et al. 2005). Thus one of the global challenges for the next century is the need to develop high-yielding varieties that require minimal…

Some thoughtful and interesting letters in response to the OpEd that James McWilliams and I wrote recently for the NY Times. Here are some highlights: I think that there are many in the organic food movement who recognize that genetic engineering has a role to play in the future of food. But concerns about what…

A Harvest for 9.2 Billion

The number of people on Earth is expected to shoot up from the current 6.7 billion to 9.2 billion by 2050. How will we feed them? If we continue with current farming practices, vast amounts of wilderness will be lost, millions of birds and billions of insects will die, and farm workers will be exposed…

Thinking Beyond Organic

There is little doubt that organic farmers have been instrumental in bringing the need for ecologically based agriculture to the public’s attention. That is a good start. We now need to move beyond organic (still only ca 2% of US agriculture) and embrace other tools and farming practices that can help shift current agricultural systems…

Tomorrow’s Table’s Swiss-Gruyere pie made it to the pi day Pie Bake off finals. If you have time to peruse the entries, please do. Vote here.

Pie is a constant in my life

For the 2010 Pi day bakeoff, I baked a Swiss chard-Gruyere pie. Shown here is the backdrop to our garden:a mural on the side of our barn, painted with California poppies, rice plants, sunflowers and (look closely) a red double helix. Artist: Jim McCall, Elastic Media. Here is the recipe:

Thank you Bill Gates for your work on behalf of farmers and…. for blogging on our book, Tomorrow’s Table! If you don’t have time to read the full reviews, here are a few excerpts: