Transcription and Translation

Archives for December, 2008

Here I am, in the lab with one last experiment to go before I leave to feast on a Christmas Eve dinner, so while I wait for that last centrifugation step, I’ll write a quick post about all these great papers on RNA Polymerase II and chromatin remodelling. As I’ve said before, if you want…

This is hard. A few days before Xmass, I have HOT results comming out of the lab, and a major snafu is comming out of that endless reservoir of angst, scientists complaining about science journalists … and now those science journalists are lashing back. I have to say that I really like George Johnson, but…

Tid Bits – Snowy Sunday Edition

The lack of posts can be explained by this equation (lab work = 1/updates) so I’ll make it up to you with a weekend smorgasbord of links. So today as I sit in my warm cozy snowed-in apartment I present to you the latest edition of Tib Bits. First off, I would like to wish…

There is a lot of fear and worry in the scientific community as it is becoming more apparent that the financial crisis is impacting University endowments and state funding of public universities. Postdocs applying for faculty positions are especially nervous. So how will science funding look in the next few years? There are rumours circulating…

Molecular and Cell Biology Carnival #5

Welcome to the December 14, 2008 edition of the Molecular and Cell Biology Carnival. Below the fold, we have a great compilation of entries to share with you.

At least Dr Prasher, the man who cloned the gene for GFP, is getting some recognition. Boston Metro: This man gave away a Nobel Prize

I just read this fascinating theory that was fully explained in a review that appeared in the latest issue of Cell. This theory connects the origin of cell polarity with aging and it suggests that the centrosome may carry genetic information. Today I’ll focus on the first deep connection polarity and aging. Later this week,…

Quote of the Day

George Emil Palade, universally hailed as the founder of modern cell biology for his many discoveries and insights into the structure and function of eukaryotic cells, died on 7 October at the age of 95. He was pre-eminent among a small group of scientists who, in the mid-twentieth century, first used the electron microscope to…

Financial Woes Hit Universities

I don’t have much time today so I’ll tell you a quick story and give you a collection of links. Harvard’s big endowment loss has been the main topic of conversation around the campus for the past week. For example, last Friday, my wife and I were fortunate to get two tickets to see the…

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