Education

Category archives for Education

[This fall, I'm teaching a course at Emerson College called "Plagues and Pandemics." I'll be periodically posting the contents of my lectures and my experiences as a first time college instructor] Lecture 1 That was a scene from Monty Python’s Holy Grail, demonstrating the lighter side of the plague. Who knew there was a lighter…

For the past 3 years, I’ve had the opportunity to spend a week in a house on a beautiful lake in Vermont. Usually, this week is a chance to completely unplug. I take some photos, buy a bunch of books from Northshire and read them, and lounge around. On this past trip however, I received…

Obesity, Inflammation, and Diabetes

This entry is cross posted from the the SITN Flash, a bimonthly publication written and edited by Harvard graduate students. You can find my piece, as well as archives of previous articles written by many graduate students at the Science in the News website. In 1985, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) began tracking the…

Last month, I linked to an article written by Harvard graduate student Laura Strittmatter about Resveratrol, a compound in red wine that had been linked to anti-aging effects in studies on rodents. Recently, a paper was published in Nature calling that research into question. This isn’t a problem in science – this is how it’s…

That one looks delicious

While researching my recent post on the Nobel Prize, I discovered that the website has a series of “educational productions,” including games and written/illustrated primers on different topics. I’ve been playing the malaria game all morning – you have to fly a mosquito around drinking the blood of humans while avoiding bug spray and mosquito…

Scientists communicating their science

Christie Wilcox has a great post over at Science Sushi about why scientists should be on social media. I don’t disagree with anything she says, and I try to do it myself (see: the twitter and G+ links to the left… I also recently signed up for tumblr which is kind of fun). But sometimes…

For anyone in the Boston Area, two of my colleagues and I will be giving a talk on how the immune system recognizes and responds to pathogens, and how understanding this will allow scientists to design better vaccines and more effectively treat illness. How to Spot a Virus: The origins of an immune response. This…

A reward well deserved

Jad Abumrad, co-host of the amazing “Radiolab” just won a McArthur genius grant – a $500,000 prize with almost no limits on how to spend it. If you’ve never listened to Radiolab, stop reading blogs, go download an episode sit back with a good pair of headphones. It’s beautifully produced, a joy to listen to,…

Harvard Science in the News begins its fall lecture series this week with a talk on the interface between human brains and machines: I went to the practice talk last week, and it’s going to be great! From retinal implants to controlling robots with your mind, Harvard neuroscience graduate students will take you through the…

Extending life with red wine

The latest Science in the News Flash is up, and it examines the anti-aging research surrounding the molecule resveratrol, which is present at low concentrations in red wine: If resveratrol were able to mimic the lifespan-extending effects of caloric restriction in people without requiring such an extreme diet, it would be very popular, especially if…