Science Process

Category archives for Science Process

Open Laboratory 2013

If you’ve been reading science blogs for a while, you probably know about Open Laboratory. It’s a yearly anthology of the best science blog writing on the internet. And the submission form is now open (there’s a handy little badge in the left sidebar too). If you appreciate the stuff that I do here, please…

The Future of Science Publishing

A little over 300 years ago, Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, a dry goods seller from Delft in Holland, learned to grind glass into lenses and fashion the best microscopes the world had ever seen. In those days, the idea of being a “scientist” as a profession was ludicrous. Natural philosophy was pastime for nobility or at…

Bad Science in Science Fiction

I’m sure that science isn’t the only profession that gets misrepresented in popular media. I’m sure lawyers and police cringe when watching crime dramas, and soldiers are uncomfortable when watching war movies. Leaving aside shows like CSI, I think that scientist’s main media foil is almost by definition science fiction. On the one hand, I’ve…

Nobel controversy update

Back in October, I wrote about the bittersweet nature of this year’s Nobel in Physiology or Medicine. On the one hand, it was given for early discoveries in the field of innate immunity – my field! On the other hand, it was given to a scientist that many* feel is undeserving of the honor, while…

Monday’s announcement for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine should have been a happy occasion for my lab. On the one hand, it was given for early discoveries in the field of innate immunity – my field! On the other hand, it was given to a scientist that many* feel is undeserving of the…

Over at Pharyngula, PZ mentions a media criticism paper in the journal Public Understanding of Science. The paper shows that media outlets frequently make scientific claims that are dubious at best. I suppose this isn’t very surprising, but PZ makes another great point: It isn’t open access, though, so apparently the Public is not allowed…

Not bored of Arsenic yet?

The arsenic story continues. After much discussion in the blogosphere and elsewhere about the controversial paper claiming to have discovered life that uses arsenic rather than phosphorus in its DNA, Science has published 8 critiques of the paper and a response by the author. You can find them here. I enjoyed reading them, and was…

Over at the Cambridge Science Festival blog, there’s a great write-up of the science journalism event that Heather and I attended last week. Author Jordan Calmes* has good summary and a lot of praise for the panel discussion, but also notes some potential shortcomings: The panel convinced me that social media is helping both journalists…

Last night, Heather and I got to attend a dinner and panel on science journalism and new media. In addition to getting to meet two of my science blogging heros, Carl Zimmer* and Ed Yong, it was a great opportunity to interact and hear from lots of folks far more tuned into the writing and…

Activities report

Last year, I was awarded an NSF graduate research fellowship. This fellowship pays my tuition and stipend for 3 years, so that my boss doesn’t have to. This is a great help to our lab, though I don’t really get much in the way of direct benefit* (other than a great line on my CV).…