Science Process

Category archives for Science Process

New Years Resolution: Data

Yesterday was my birthday, and I tend to use this time in April to re-up my commitment to all of those resolutions that I failed at around Jan 5th. And add a new one: Data is the name of the game. – Millions of cells in the incubator? Check! – Freshly-made solutions and buffers? Check!…

Lobbying Congress

The Power of Research (a game!)

For those of you don’t already have some affliction (facebook, reddit etc) that sucks up all the time you should really be working, try: The Power of Research! I didn’t get very far, but only because I have real lab work to do. It seems silly to procrastinate by doing a virtual research project. It…

A week of brain biggering

I got to spend last week in sunny California. I forgot how wonderful it is to sit and eat lunch outside! I was participating in a workshop held at the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The workshop was entitled Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics. Basically I spent the week learning about different tools that…

At the superbowl party at my house last weekend, most folks didn’t really have a stake in who won. But several friends were rooting for Pittsburg to loose, largely due to their quarterback, Ben Roethlisberger. In case you don’t pay attention to sports news (like me), Roethlisberger was twice accused of rape/sexual assault in the…

New Lab Resolutions

My common New Year’s resolutions (get more exercise, keep my lab notebook up to date, etc) rarely make it off the starting block. In this I am hardly unique, and there are very good reasons why, so I usually also try to make one major, sort of intangible resolution. This year for instance (largely because…

Geek Manifesto – go help

Mark Henderson of The Times is embarking on (what I think is) a great project – highlighting the contribution that the science savvy can have and are having on public discourse. The intersection of science and politics is a growing interest of mine, though I don’t have nearly as much credibility as many others around…

Trial by Twitter

The heavy hitters in the science publishing business are taking notice. This critical onslaught was striking — but not exceptional. Papers are increasingly being taken apart in blogs, on Twitter and on other social media within hours rather than years, and in public, rather than at small conferences or in private conversation. Like everything else…

Like so many things, the problem is best explained with an analogy. Imagine a car parked in a dark garage (if you’re a mechanic by hobby or trade, make it a computer). Someone hands you keys to the car, a flashlight and a piece of metal that she says belongs to a car similar to…

If you’ve had your head in the sand for the last 2 weeks, you might have missed the story about arsenic in bacteria and the resulting controversy. If you did go read Ed Yong first. In an editorial published today in Nature, the editors make a similar point to the one I made yesterday, namely…