Medical education

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Category archives for Medical education

Yes, this is a repost, sort of. I first put this up on denialism blog in December of 2008. For various reasons, I haven’t had a chance to crank out anything fresh this weekend, but this is still a good one, and I’ve edited it to freshen it up a bit, so don’t complain until…

“A state of institutional denialism”

Over a quarter century ago, a young woman was admitted to a New York hospital with fever and agitation. She never walked out. Libby Zion died while under the care of he primary care doctor and two medical residents. The exact cause of death was never identified, but the case led to a forced examination…

ACGME moves to limit resident work hours

When it comes to medical blogging, no one has been as consistently good, fresh, and snarky as Orac. Respectful Insolence sets the standard for all other medical blogs, and though Orac may not be a media star like some other med bloggers, his writing has had a significant impact on some important medical issues such…

Dear Dr. Pal

A young relative of mine recently asked me my thoughts about medicine as a career.   It’s a relatively common question in my mail bag, and a tough one to answer, especially when asked by strangers.  Career choices are very personal, so I don’t like to give advice as much as let people know what they…

Dr. Jerome Groopman, whose writing I generally enjoy, put out a book a couple of years ago called How Doctors Think. It examined, well, how doctors think, how they think they think, and what the future holds for diagnosing disease. It’s a good book, but with some faulty assumptions. I’m not the guy to write…

How do you say it?

On July 4th at 5 a.m., I’m loading the family into the car and driving very far away, where cellphones, pagers, and most critically the internet, do not work. Blogging has been very hard for me lately. I love writing, but due to work and family mishegos it’s been hard to keep up with the…

Happy New (Medical) Year!

The medical education calendar begins and ends on the first of July each year, and in the hospital, that means a brand spanking new crop of young doctors. While this may sound a bit scary, the facts are a bit subtle (and not terrifying). Some of the questions regarding the so-called July Phenomenon are: Are…