World's Fair

Archives for July, 2006

A: Probably. * * * DN: So Ben, what’s up with those mountain tops? BRC: They’re fewer than there used to be, that’s what I know. DN: Less places to ski and stuff? BRC: But many more places to golf, apparently.

The question posed this time: Are there any children’s books that are dear to you, either as a child or a parent, and especially ones that perhaps strike a chord with those from a science sensibility? Just curious really. And it doesn’t have to be a picture book, doesn’t even have to be a children’s…

Weather is not a pest

A few months ago, I attended a conference called Writing Home, Science, Literature, and the Aesthetics of Place, which had a nice byline written by Gary Geddes. It read: “Philosophy,” Novalis said, “is really homesickness, it is the urge to be at home everywhere.” The home-place assumes many different guises. A physicist or mathematician may…

It’s ironic but having just answered a scienceblogger question about preservation, I’m aware of a personal predicament that addresses some of the same ideals. Namely, I’ve got a critter in my backyard. This is what I saw on my lawn this morning:

I’ve been so busy writing about children’s books, putting up silly lists, and presenting puzzles that I feel the need to write about one of the things I’m most comfortable with – that is, genetics:

Having been asked as a Science Blogger the following: If you could have practiced science in any time and any place throughout history, which would it be, and why?… I say: Mid-Eighteenth Century France or Thereabouts (with Scottish and Swedish and American colleagues, sure) Diderot, D’Alembert, Condillac, Condorcet, Rousseau, Voltaire, Lavoisier, David Hume, Benjamin Franklin,…

So I’m a teacher type right? And what do I think of powerpoint? Well, it’s certainly convenient, although to be honest, I’m partial to good old real time pen and projector or chalk and blackboard lectures (a good way to pace yourself). Anyway, I’ve had ongoing requests to put up some of the powerpoint slides…

“On Evidence” (and in reference to the on-going, yet still unsolved Puzzle Fantastica #1) Since this is a science blog and scientists and engineers are all about evidence and experiments and so on, we broach the subject of evidence. Namely, what kinds of evidence have we offered, and how has that evidence been interpreted? Some…

For centuries we’ve languished in the abyss of not-knowing what science is. An abyss so deep and so languishable, that we didn’t even know we didn’t know. A true Rumsfeldian dilemma, with mixed metaphors to boot. What accounts for scientific excellence and credibility? Why do we trust scientists? Is it because they are so serious?…